GPS info in IP addresses

JohnM <JohnM@competitive.com> Fri, 16 August 1996 03:05 UTC

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From: JohnM <JohnM@competitive.com>
To: 'Paul Ferguson' <pferguso@cisco.com>
Cc: "'davidc@APNIC.NET'" <davidc@apnic.net>, "'dfk@RIPE.NET'" <dfk@ripe.net>, "'kimh@internic.net'" <kimh@internic.net>, "'markk@internic.net'" <markk@internic.net>, "'Postel@ISI.EDU'" <Postel@isi.edu>, 'Jim Browning' <jfbb@atmnet.net>
Cc: 'CIDRD List' <cidrd@iepg.org>, 'IESG' <iesg@CNRI.Reston.VA.US>, 'IETF' <ietf@CNRI.Reston.VA.US>
Subject: GPS info in IP addresses
Date: Thu, 15 Aug 1996 23:00:33 -0400
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You are right - to attempt to use gps information for routing based on
the current wiring scheme would not be easily feasible.  However,
including gps information along with currently manually managed
numbering schemes in the ip address would allow both routing and device
location identification to occur.  I know that is not what I stated in
my earlier communique. I apologize for the misleading statement.

The benefit of placing geographic information in the IP address, despite
the fact that we cannot (yet) use this info for routing, is that various
network devices will be locatable within a physical space.  This will be
a real benefit for people trying to locate devices that need service,
etc. in a large network.  No protocol to date provides such information.

But one day some protocol will.   ;-)


>----------
>From: 	Paul Ferguson[SMTP:pferguso@cisco.com]
>Sent: 	Monday, July 29, 1996 2:59 PM
>To: 	JohnM
>Cc: 	'davidc@APNIC.NET';; 'dfk@RIPE.NET';; 'kimh@internic.net';;
>'markk@internic.net';; 'Postel@ISI.EDU';; 'Jim Browning'; 'CIDRD List'; 'IESG';
>'IETF'
>Subject: 	RE: draft-hubbard-registry-guidelines-03.txt
>
>At 11:08 AM 7/29/96 -0400, JohnM wrote:
>
>>
>>Consider the Internet-draft that would allow all IP addresses to be
>>created and used dynamically.  Addresses would be created primarily by
>>using global positioning (latitude-longitude-altitude) information
>>coupled with MAC  addresses (network interface card manufacturer/serial
>>numbers).
>>
>
>Out of morbid curiousity, what happens to the plethora of devices which
>are backhauled?
>
>(For what its worth, I like Kim Hubbard's [et al.] draft.)
>
>- paul
>
>