Re: [Cbor] CBOR magic number, file format and tags

Doug Ewell <doug@ewellic.org> Thu, 21 January 2021 02:16 UTC

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From: "Doug Ewell" <doug@ewellic.org>
To: "'Michael Richardson'" <mcr+ietf@sandelman.ca>, <cbor@ietf.org>
Cc: "'cose'" <cose@ietf.org>
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Subject: Re: [Cbor] CBOR magic number, file format and tags
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> Since very early in computing, operating systems have sought ways to
> mark which files could be proposed by which programs.

The word "proposed" feels very awkward here. Maybe "opened" or "manipulated," or some recasting of the sentence that talks about files "belonging to" programs, or something similar.

--
Doug Ewell, CC, ALB | Thornton, CO, US | ewellic.org


-----Original Message-----
From: CBOR <cbor-bounces@ietf.org> On Behalf Of Michael Richardson
Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2021 16:56
To: cbor@ietf.org
Cc: cose <cose@ietf.org>
Subject: [Cbor] CBOR magic number, file format and tags


Hi, I was thinking about this yesterday too, and after the discussion this morning at COSE, I wrote:

         https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/draft-richardson-cbor-file-magic/

which is at:
         https://github.com/mcr/cbor-magic-number


# Introduction

Since very early in computing, operating systems have sought ways to mark which files could be proposed by which programs.

For instance, the Unix file(1) command, which has existed since 1973 ({{file}}), has been able to identify many file formats for decades.

...