Re: [DNSOP] additional special names Fwd: I-D Action: draft-chapin-additional-reserved-tlds-00.txt

David Conrad <drc@virtualized.org> Thu, 27 February 2014 06:16 UTC

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From: David Conrad <drc@virtualized.org>
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Date: Thu, 27 Feb 2014 14:16:15 +0800
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To: Mark Andrews <marka@isc.org>
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Subject: Re: [DNSOP] additional special names Fwd: I-D Action: draft-chapin-additional-reserved-tlds-00.txt
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Mark,

On Feb 27, 2014, at 10:14 AM, Mark Andrews <marka@isc.org>; wrote:
>>> There are many, many TLDs under which an application/protocol implementer can reserve some namespace for their exclusive use at low cost ($10/year, say). Why is this approach not preferred for a new application/protocol? It seems far simpler.
>> 
>> Why does RFC 1918 address space exist?
> 
> Because IPv4 address were and always have been a scarse resource and RFC 1918 is a reaction to that.  

Not really.  RFC 1918 was created when IPv4 addresses were still relatively plentiful.  Many folks used 1918 space because they didn't want to be bothered with putting up with the hassles and cost (even if it was trivial) of obtaining space from the registries for a resource that was never going to be used on the Internet.

There are a number of potential options for 'private' domain space. I do not believe the answer of "buy a domain" will alleviate the problem as paying money and wading through web forms, etc., will always be harder that simply squatting on a domain name.

Regards,
-drc