Re: [gaia] disaster relief communication - Project Loon over Puerto Rico

Richard Dent <rd459@cam.ac.uk> Sat, 07 October 2017 11:45 UTC

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Subject: Re: [gaia] disaster relief communication - Project Loon over Puerto Rico
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Google are deploying Project Loon for disaster connectivity

https://9to5google.com/2017/10/06/alphabet-x-project-loon-puerto-rico/



On 07/10/2017 00:43, Rex Buddenberg wrote:
> Dan,
>
> The inverse might be useful too.  What didn't work.
>
> The phone companies have, for several years, cell towers on wheels
> known as COWs.
>       If the cell technology in the COW is 3G or earlier, it's not
> internet.  If it's 4G (aka LTE), then it arguably is internet (partly
> depending on what the backhaul switching is).
>       If the emergency installation is a seed of a future permanent
> infrastructure, the determinant is probably the user interface.  If
> that interface is WiFi or cellphone, then you have a future.  (Since
> neither of those technologies were popular in the grey box military,
> this isn't always a moot point).
>       The civil and electrical engineering parts of a COW are
> independent of the technology -- gotta have electrical power, need an
> antenna, more height the better, fuel, need the usual list of other
> things, including personnel support.
>
> I think the meta question, one level up, is whether you are going to
> have two infrastructures or one.  EMS folks have not come eagerly to
> internet technologies (observation dependent on what country you're in
> ... mileage may vary).  In US we have two comms systems in parallel --
> one for the homeowner to call the PSAP to report a fire and an entirely
> different comms system for the dispatcher to roll the fire truck.  We
> ought to carefully consider why we have two infrastructures and whether
> that is a good idea in the future (I do have my opinions on the
> matter.;)
>
> b
>
>
>
> On Fri, 2017-10-06 at 18:26 -0400, Dan Bateyko wrote:
>> Thanks all for the thoughtful responses. Lee and Jane, hope to meet
>> you and whomever else on the listserv at Radical Networks to talk
>> more.
>>
>> Best,
>> Dan
>>
>> On Fri, Oct 6, 2017 at 5:48 PM, Lee W McKnight <lmcknigh@syr.edu>
>> wrote:
>>> Hi Jane, folks
>>>
>>> Perfect set - up : ) Since folks asked...my improptu Friday
>>> afternoon lecture:
>>>
>>> There has been a bunch of academic work around use of social media
>>> in disaster response, including the Ushahidi project which we have
>>> written about previously.
>>>
>>> That assumes you have a functional Internet, and power grid. So
>>> reviews of some latency-insensitive messaging apps in
>>> recent Houston flood were very positive. Helped organize the
>>> impromptu Cajun Navy for example. In other cases like Boston
>>> bombing a few years ago signal to noise ratio was off with people
>>> being falsely accused. FBI tracked perpetrators in end not from
>>> social media but mainly from store security cameras new site of
>>> bombing.
>>>
>>> Still, incorporating social media into disaster response is a basic
>>> thing these days, even if in US over 50% of 911 call centers are
>>> not yet equipped to receive text or images.
>>>
>>> General category we have been researching and developing at
>>> Syracuse University for some time is 'social emergency response'
>>> - which aggregates any functional, and identified, equipment and
>>> networks available.  Including for 'worst case scenario' disasters.
>>>   So not worrying so much about P.25 interoperability as augmenting
>>> around/beyond that, in scenarios like Haiti earthquake, or Puerto
>>> Rico today, where cel towers and other infrastructure is knocked
>>> out.
>>>
>>> In theory and NSF research with software defined/cognitive radio we
>>> have shown previously that a lot can be done to augment the reach
>>> of emergency response incident commanders communication, and
>>> strengthen an information mesh around them for 'Advanced
>>> Situational Awareness.'
>>>
>>> More recently we have  a dumbed down but functional and deployable
>>> version that uses cloud services to manage devices and rf networks
>>> and reach the Internet (text & gps only) via a satphone hotspot,
>>> and a couple tethered smart phones, in emergency and/or educational
>>> use. A startup company is just starting to produce those in
>>> modest volumes.
>>>
>>> Currently we have an Internet Backpack beta being tested by Goma
>>> Volcano Observatory in Democratic Republic of Congo, which was
>>> tested on top of the world's 3rd most dangerous volcano a month
>>> ago, and was already used in emergency response drills in
>>> neighboring communities; which also doubles as an instant school
>>> network/STEM/Internet of Things kit.
>>>
>>> That is under discussion to spread to another hundred or so schools
>>> and hence 100 + more instant community networks in North Kivu.
>>>
>>> Following on from that very very bandwidth limited thing, we are
>>> discussing building out across the schools and communities in North
>>> Kivu - and 5 other Provinces/Conflict Zones becoming Innovation
>>> Zones - a 24 Ghz 1G wifi data net for research and education
>>> purposes; which is basically same wireless equipment configuration
>>> as used in past emergencies (Haiti earthquake, Nepal earthquake) to
>>> get a data net up fast in those disaster regions. Chris Sedore,
>>> NYSERNET president, is the guy who has been there and done that in
>>> past, and we are working in tandem to extend from 1 Internet
>>> backpack to hopefully 30% Internet (from 4%) penetration in DRC
>>> provinces  quick. May or may not work, but excitement about instant
>>> limited solution of Internet backpack has folks ready to listen to
>>> our other suggestions. See http://www.iatag.org for short form
>>> summary.  A longer form is the 30 in 2020 white paper attached,
>>> most recent is TPRC paper version. Liberia and other nations are
>>> interested in aspects of model already, even though we have just
>>> one Internet Backpack in field and have not digitally transformed
>>> any region. Lately.  Liberia will get a couple packs later this
>>> month at request of their President, who is focusing more on intant
>>> education/community network than disaster response aspects.
>>>
>>> To check out what we are talking about (Internet Backpack) with its
>>> dual emergency and educatonal/micro-community network
>>> functions live - join us Sat. Oct. 21 @ Radical Networks in
>>> Brooklyn, in workshops 10:30am - 3:30pm. http://radicalnetworks.org
>>> / Courtesy ISOC-NYC/ISOC.
>>>
>>> So to summarize, we are discussing and have a modular - innovation
>>> zone model - to help regions grow their infrastructure, whether
>>> disaster is an emergency incident, or the daily life crisis of
>>> living in a province with 4% Internet access. A bit too soon to say
>>> model is proven even if we know the Internet Backpack works.
>>>
>>> (And if there is interest and a GAIA opprtunitiy to discuss further
>>> in Singapore, remotely, I am up for that; due to my teaching
>>> obligations I can't make it in person. For following meeting in
>>> London March 2018 I do look forward to attending and eprhaps
>>> meeting some of you then.)
>>>
>>> thanks,
>>>
>>> Lee W McKnight  | Associate Professor |  School of Information
>>> Studies
>>> Syracuse University
>>> 228 Hinds Hall
>>> Syracuse, New York 13244  USA
>>> +1 (315) 278.4392    lmcknigh@syr.edu    ischool.syr.edu
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> From: Jane Coffin <coffin@isoc.org>
>>> Sent: Friday, October 6, 2017 4:26 PM
>>> To: Dan Bateyko; Arzak Khan; Lee W McKnight
>>> Cc: Rex Buddenberg; gaia; Steve Song; Kurtis Heimerl; Arjuna
>>> Sathiaseelan
>>>
>>> Subject: Re: [gaia] disaster relief communication
>>>   
>>> Hi Dan –
>>>   
>>> Adding Lee McKnight from Syracuse.
>>>   
>>> Lee – what do you think?
>>>   
>>> Jane
>>>   
>>>   
>>> Internet Society | www.internetsociety.org
>>> Skype:  janercoffin
>>> Mobile/WhatsApp:  +1.202.247.8429
>>>   
>>> From: gaia <gaia-bounces@irtf.org> on behalf of Dan Bateyko <dbatey
>>> ko@gmail.com>
>>> Date: Friday, October 6, 2017 at 4:58 PM
>>> To: Arzak Khan <director@ipop.org.pk>
>>> Cc: Rex Buddenberg <buddenbergr@gmail.com>, gaia <gaia@irtf.org>,
>>> Steve Song <stevesong@nsrc.org>, Kurtis Heimerl <kheimerl@cs.washin
>>> gton.edu>, Arjuna Sathiaseelan <arjuna.sathiaseelan@cl.cam.ac.uk>
>>> Subject: Re: [gaia] disaster relief communication
>>>   
>>> Hi all,
>>>   
>>> Question inspired by this thread:  Could anyone point me to an
>>> example of ICT for disaster relief becoming the de facto
>>> infrastructure in a region post-crisis? Wondering if there's a
>>> "Shock Doctrine" for telecommunication.
>>>   
>>> As ever,
>>> Dan
>>>   
>>> On Thu, Oct 5, 2017 at 9:44 AM, Arzak Khan <director@ipop.org.pk>
>>> wrote:
>>> Dear All,
>>>   
>>> We at Internet Policy Observatory Pakistan are running an
>>> initiative called TOPS (Tactical Operations) activated during
>>> disasters across Pakistan. Basically our tactical operations
>>> provide the following:
>>>   
>>> 1) Tactical Operations team uses portable satellite communications
>>> equipment to provide voice and data communications for aid workers
>>> who rely on these tools to coordinate logistics and deliver
>>> lifesaving supplies.
>>> 2) Provide vital ICT Support (Internet, Telephone, Sat-phone and E-
>>> mail) to first responders and relief organizations.
>>> 3) Establish multiple communications center equipped with internet,
>>> phone and radio capabilities. In addition, iPOP tactical operations
>>> team also provides free phone calls to people living in temporary
>>> camps and shelters.
>>> 4) Establish dedicated communication center for women enabling them
>>> to communication and reconnect them with displaced family
>>> members.
>>> We have been working jointly with Provincial Disaster Management
>>> Authorities on various missions during floods, earthquake and other
>>> man made disasters. You can learn more about it http://ipop.org.pk/
>>> initiatives/tops/
>>>   
>>>   
>>> Internet Policy Observatory Pakistan | iPOP Tactical ...
>>>   
>>> ipop.org.pk
>>>   
>>> Internet Policy Observatory Pakistan tactical operations team can
>>> establish satellite based communications system so government
>>> agencies, humanitarian organizations ...
>>>   
>>>   
>>>   
>>> I would be happy to share further insight in to out planning and
>>> deployment if needed.
>>>   
>>> Best,
>>>   
>>> Arzak Khan
>>>   
>>>   
>>>
>>> From: gaia <gaia-bounces@irtf.org> on behalf of Kurtis Heimerl <khe
>>> imerl@cs.washington.edu>
>>> Sent: Tuesday, October 3, 2017 6:14 PM
>>> To: Rex Buddenberg
>>> Cc: gaia; Steve Song; Arjuna Sathiaseelan
>>> Subject: Re: [gaia] disaster relief communication
>>>   
>>> I want to support Steve's request here; as someone who has dabbled
>>> in Disaster Relief it feels like there's an opportunity to do
>>> impactful work in the space but I don't know of any good places to
>>> get grounded in the current state of the art. Can we have any part
>>> of the upcoming GAIA meeting be focused on exploring this topic?
>>> Any domain experts in Singapore we can invite?
>>>   
>>> On Tue, Oct 3, 2017 at 11:04 AM, Rex Buddenberg <buddenbergr@gmail.
>>> com> wrote:
>>> Suggest that there are two (at least) genres that need to be merged
>>> --
>>> treated together.  Emergency services (reach to fire/ ambulance/
>>> police/ ...) is the other genre.  In a disaster, expect a push to
>>> build
>>> out both.
>>>
>>> Emergency services communications is one of the bastions of non-IP
>>> technologies.  P25 is an example of a protocol heavily pushed by
>>> various emergency services agencies. But it's non-routable.  Much
>>> of
>>> the development has been colored by the perceived need to jam
>>> whatever
>>> comms link is concocted into the narrowband Land Mobile Radio
>>> channels
>>> (25kHz and less).
>>>
>>> The economics is that the two genres end up costing twice for the
>>> infrastructure.  This is true both for permanent infrastructure and
>>> quick-build into disaster areas.
>>>
>>> Warning: this is an area of acrimonious debate, often sadly lacking
>>> in
>>> facts.  But it is a debate that needs to be joined.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On Tue, 2017-10-03 at 17:40 +0100, Arjuna Sathiaseelan wrote:
>>>> Hello Steve,
>>>>
>>>> the IEEE global humanitarian technology conference is a good
>>> venue to
>>>> look at for the latest research/deployment experience papers:
>>>>
>>>> last year: http://sites.ieee.org/ghtc/event-2016/call-for-papers-
>>> 2016
>>>> /
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> this looks like a good journal to keep an eye on when the papers
>>> get
>>>> published: http://ieeeaccess.ieee.org/special-sections-closed/mis
>>> sion
>>>> -critical-public-safety-communications-architectures-enabling-
>>>> technologies-future-applications/
>>>> regards
>>>>
>>>> a decent survey paper:
>>>> http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/87438/5/Survey_of_wireless_communi
>>> cati
>>>> on_technologies_for_public_safety.pdf
>>>>
>>>> regards
>>>>
>>>> On 3 October 2017 at 17:25, Steve Song <stevesong@nsrc.org>
>>> wrote:
>>>>> Hi all,
>>>>>
>>>>> Are there any particularly good web resources and/or academic
>>>>> papers that
>>>>> profile the range of disaster relief technologies / solutions
>>> both
>>>>> planned
>>>>> and currently in use?
>>>>>
>>>>> Many thanks... Steve
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>> +1 902 529 0046
>>>>> stevesong@nsrc.org
>>>>> http://nsrc.org
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>> gaia mailing list
>>>>> gaia@irtf.org
>>>>> https://www.irtf.org/mailman/listinfo/gaia
>>>>>
>>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
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>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> gaia mailing list
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>>>
>>>
>>>   
>>> --
>>> Dan Bateyko
>>> http://dbateyko.me/
>>>
>>
>> -- 
>> Dan Bateyko
>> http://dbateyko.me/
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-- 
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University of Cambridge

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