Re: [79all] IETF Badge

Dave CROCKER <dhc2@dcrocker.net> Thu, 11 November 2010 23:36 UTC

Return-Path: <dhc2@dcrocker.net>
X-Original-To: ietf@core3.amsl.com
Delivered-To: ietf@core3.amsl.com
Received: from localhost (localhost [127.0.0.1]) by core3.amsl.com (Postfix) with ESMTP id 4A40C3A63CB for <ietf@core3.amsl.com>; Thu, 11 Nov 2010 15:36:53 -0800 (PST)
X-Virus-Scanned: amavisd-new at amsl.com
X-Spam-Flag: NO
X-Spam-Score: -6.569
X-Spam-Level:
X-Spam-Status: No, score=-6.569 tagged_above=-999 required=5 tests=[AWL=0.030, BAYES_00=-2.599, RCVD_IN_DNSWL_MED=-4]
Received: from mail.ietf.org ([64.170.98.32]) by localhost (core3.amsl.com [127.0.0.1]) (amavisd-new, port 10024) with ESMTP id R+0UIooyKXeo for <ietf@core3.amsl.com>; Thu, 11 Nov 2010 15:36:52 -0800 (PST)
Received: from sbh17.songbird.com (sbh17.songbird.com [72.52.113.17]) by core3.amsl.com (Postfix) with ESMTP id DA6DB3A6784 for <ietf@ietf.org>; Thu, 11 Nov 2010 15:36:51 -0800 (PST)
Received: from [10.1.87.158] ([124.193.12.156]) (authenticated bits=0) by sbh17.songbird.com (8.13.8/8.13.8) with ESMTP id oABNbFk4003222 (version=TLSv1/SSLv3 cipher=AES256-SHA bits=256 verify=NO) for <ietf@ietf.org>; Thu, 11 Nov 2010 15:37:22 -0800
Message-ID: <4CDC7E27.90003@dcrocker.net>
Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2010 07:37:11 +0800
From: Dave CROCKER <dhc2@dcrocker.net>
Organization: Brandenburg InternetWorking
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 6.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2.12) Gecko/20101027 Thunderbird/3.1.6
MIME-Version: 1.0
To: ietf@ietf.org
Subject: Re: [79all] IETF Badge
References: <alpine.BSF.2.00.1011090344110.46514@fledge.watson.org> <CD5674C3CD99574EBA7432465FC13C1B2202288A0B@DC-US1MBEX4.global.avaya.com> <4CDBCD06.2020108@dcrocker.net> <4CDBFAE7.6030800@ripe.net> <4CDC0A4E.3040604@dcrocker.net> <4CDC141F.6070609@stpeter.im> <4CDC77AD.9000302@gmail.com>
In-Reply-To: <4CDC77AD.9000302@gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
X-Greylist: Sender succeeded SMTP AUTH, not delayed by milter-greylist-4.0 (sbh17.songbird.com [72.52.113.17]); Thu, 11 Nov 2010 15:37:23 -0800 (PST)
X-BeenThere: ietf@ietf.org
X-Mailman-Version: 2.1.9
Precedence: list
Reply-To: dcrocker@bbiw.net
List-Id: IETF-Discussion <ietf.ietf.org>
List-Unsubscribe: <https://www.ietf.org/mailman/listinfo/ietf>, <mailto:ietf-request@ietf.org?subject=unsubscribe>
List-Archive: <http://www.ietf.org/mail-archive/web/ietf>
List-Post: <mailto:ietf@ietf.org>
List-Help: <mailto:ietf-request@ietf.org?subject=help>
List-Subscribe: <https://www.ietf.org/mailman/listinfo/ietf>, <mailto:ietf-request@ietf.org?subject=subscribe>
X-List-Received-Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2010 23:36:53 -0000

On 11/12/2010 7:09 AM, Scott Brim wrote:
> Was it in Paris that laptops were being stolen from the meeting rooms?
> I recall wishing that room entry restrictions would be enforced.


and munich and stockholm.  the latter was from under the seat while the person 
was sitting there in the middle of a session...

Any presumption of property safety in IETF meeting rooms is misplaced.

Unfortunately, I do not, for one second, believe that checking badges at the 
door changes this particular security exposure.

As much as our group tone and longevity encourages the view of collegial 
familiarity, in reality most of the 1200, or so, attendees are strangers to each 
other.  In most of the world, trusting 1200 strangers to keep one's property 
safe is not especially rational.

d/
-- 

   Dave Crocker
   Brandenburg InternetWorking
   bbiw.net