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***************************************************************************

			ACM MULTIMEDIA'95
                        November 4-9, 1995 
		    Hyatt Regency (Embarcadero)
			San Francisco, CA

  THE THIRD ACM INTERNATIONAL MULTIMEDIA CONFERENCE AND EXHIBITION

      	  Sponsored by the ACM SIG Multimedia, SIGCHI,
	SIGGRAPH, SIGMIS, SIGBIO, SIGCOMM, SIGIR and SIGOIS
         
      In cooperation with ACM SIGAPP, SIGCAPH, SIGMOD and SIGOPS


                       ADVANCE PROGRAM 

***************************************************************************


CONFERENCE COMMITTEE:

General Chair: 
	Bob Allen, Bellcore

Program Chair: 
	Polle Zellweger, Xerox PARC

Treasurer: 
	Marc Brown, DEC Systems Research Center

Exhibits: 
	Brent Hailpern, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center

Publicity: 
	Rajiv Mehrotra, University of Missouri, St. Louis

CDROM:
        Isabel Cruz, Tufts University

Workshops: 
	Ephraim Glinert, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Electronic Information: 
	Hui Zhang, Carnegie Mellon University

Tutorials: 
	Sorel Reisman, California State University, Fullerton

Demonstrations: 
	Tom Little, Boston University

Proceedings: 
	Rachelle Heller, George Washington University

Videos:
	Ralph Hill, Bellcore
	Gil Cruz, Andersen Consulting

Networking:
	Gary Paxinos, Metrolink, Inc.

Audio/Visual:
	Rodney Fuller, Claremont Graduate School

Local Arrangements:
	Mark H. Butler, University of California, Berkeley

Panels: 
	Fillia Makedon, Dartmouth College
	John Buford, University of Massachusetts-Lowell

Student Volunteers:
	Hans-Peter Dommel, University of California, Santa Cruz
European Liaison:
	Costantino Thanos, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche

Asian/Pacific Liaison:
	T.L. Kunii, University of Aizu

Industrial Liaison:
	Warren Jonen, University of Alabama, Birmingham

===============

WELCOME TO ACM MULTIMEDIA'95  

The Multimedia Revolution is well underway. Just how far we have come is
clearly shown by the range and quality of the presentations in this
ACM Multimedia'95 Conference. The current work, however, is just pointing 
the way to new horizons. Indeed, the technical advances reported in this
conference are likely some of the best indications of where the field is 
going and where progress will be made.

The heart of this conference is the technical papers. Multimedia is 
a multi-disciplinary field, and the technical presentations reflect this
diversity,  ranging from underlying technologies to applications and issues,
and from theory to practice. We believe that development of the field of 
multimedia is greatly facilitated by rigorous standards of evaluation.
For the 202 submitted papers approximately 800 reviews were obtained and  
the technical paper committee spent two days evaluating all these reviews.
It is very satisfying to see that a foundation has been established for the
highest standards of technical excellence.  The technical papers have a broad
broad international scope. Over one-third of the submissions were from outside
the US. In addition, the submittals were split 75-25 between universities
and corporate laboratories.

We are enthusiastic about the conference Plenaries.  In the Opening Plenary,
Clifford Stoll will critique the state of multimedia in Silicon Snake Oil:
What is multimedia offering?
For the Closing Plenary, Carol Peters of daVinci Time & Space will describe 
the interaction between artists and multimedia developers in Follow the 
Artists.  

The conference also has an outstanding collection of other venues, including
Panels, Tutorials, Workshops, Exhibits, Videos, and Demonstrations. The
Demonstrations Program deserves special note. On Wednesday, one track of
the conference will be devoted to formal presentations of specially selected
Featured Demonstrations.

Multimedia can substantially improve communication between information 
providers and consumers by making it more effective and more engaging. Thus,
multimedia will have a profound the impact on many areas of human activity.
We certainly hope that this technology will be used for the improvement of
society. In many cases it will be. However, it is not certain that all of the
the impact will be positive. For instance, some important educational 
institutions such as libraries and museums and even schools will have to adapt.
We have structured the conference to encourage discussion of these issues.

Conference participants will include researchers, implementors, practitioners,
educators, artists, and more. We invite you to take this opportunity to join
in active conversation within this multimedia matrix.  See and hear advances
and issues both inside and out of your particular subfield(s) as you renew old
acquaintances and make new ones.  Plan now to join us in San Francisco in 
November for this exciting multimedia event.


Bob Allen, General Chair
Polle Zellweger, Program Chair

=================


STUDENT VOLUNTEER PROGRAM
   
   ACM Multimedia'95 will provide an international forum for many
   aspects of multimedia technology. The student volunteer program
   is an opportunity for students to associate with experts in these fields.
   In return for their services, student volunteers will receive the following:
     * A student volunteer must work 8 hours to be eligible to attend
       the conference at no charge.
     * A student volunteer must work 8 more hours to be eligible to
       attend a tutorial. (16 hours of work = conference + a tutorial)
     * Tutorials will be offered on first-come, first-served basis, provided
       space is available.
     * The student volunteers will receive course materials of the tutorials
       they attend.
     * They may participate in the activities of the tutorial to the extent
       that their work duties allow.
     * Requests will be honored on a first-come, first-served basis.
     * The conference cannot pay for student lodging and travel.

                        
   Interested graduate and undergraduate students are requested to
   contact student volunteer co-ordinator for more details.
  
     Hans-Peter Dommel
     Baskin Center for Computer Sciences/Engineering
     Univ. of California, Santa Cruz
     Applied Sciences 350, CA 95064
     Phone: +1-408+459-4458
     Fax: +1-408-459-4829
  

================
  
CONFERENCE-AT-A-GLANCE

Sunday
NOVEMBER 5

7:00 AM - 4:00 PM 
Registration

FULL-DAY COURSES
9:00 AM - 5:30 PM
 
 SA1 - Introduction to HyTime 
 SA2 - Graphic Design for User Interfaces of Multimedia and Online Products
         or Services

HALF-DAY MORNING COURSES
9:00 AM - 12:30 PM 

 SA3 - Introduction to Multimedia Computing and Systems 
 SA4 - Systematic Design of Multimedia Applications 
 SA6 - An Introduction to Broadcasting for the Multimedia Professional


12:30 PM - 2:00 PM
Lunch Break

HALF-DAY AFTERNOON COURSES
2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

 SP1 - Understanding Distributed Multimedia Applications - The Architecture,
         Components, and End User Benefits 
 SP2 - Structural Issues in Multimedia Design 
 SP3 - How to Read and Evaluate a Multimedia Application 
 SP4 - Multimedia Technology in the Broadcasting Industry 
 SP5 - Cost Justification Issues in Multimedia Project Development

Monday 
NOVEMBER 6

7:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Registration

FULL-DAY COURSES
9:00 AM - 5:30 PM

 MA1 - Information Highway: A Construction Survey
 MA2 - Desktop Animation 

HALF-DAY MORNING COURSES
9:00 AM - 120:30 PM

 MA3 - Background for Digital Libraries: Information Retrieval and Hypertext
 MA4 - Packet Video: Video over IP and ATM Networks
 MA5 - Real-Time Scheduling Technology for Continuous Multimedia Applications
 MA6 - Designing University Courses in Interactive Multimedia

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM 
Lunch Break

HALF-DAY AFTERNOON COURSES
2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

 MP1 - Writing Interactive Multimedia: Creative and Critical Strategies
 MP2 - Background for Digital Libraries: Information Retrieval and Hypertext
 MP3 - Image and Video Compression Standards: Algorithms and Architectures
 MP4 - Resource Management in Distributed Video Server Environments
 MP5 - MHEG: An ISO Standard for Multimedia and Hypermedia Information Delivery


Tuesday
November 7


7:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Registration

8:45 AM - 10:30 AM
1. Conference Opening and Plenary
   Plenary Title: Silicon Snake Oil: What Multimedia is Offering?
   Speaker: Clifford Stoll

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
2A. Papers: Video Indexing and Retrieval 
2B. Papers: Supporting Collaboration Environments 
2P. Panel: The Information Superhighway:
         Electronic Democracy or Electronic Tranquilizer?

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM
Lunch Break

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
3A. Papers: Cyber Communities 
3B. Papers: Multimedia Storage Servers 
3P. Panel: Curriculum, Education and Training about Multimedia

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
4A. Papers: Authoring Flexible Documents
4B. Papers: Video Processing
4P. Panel: Multimedia on a Shoestring: Low Bandwidth Implementations

6:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Off-site conference reception, Yerba Buena Gardens

Wednesday
November 8

7:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Registration

9:00 AM - 10:30 AM 
5A. Papers: Speech and Audio Interfaces 
5D. Demonstrations: Networked Video
5P. Panel: Personal Narrative Spaces 

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM 
6A. Papers: Multimedia Network Tools
6B. Demonstrations: Video-Centric Information Systems 
6P. Panel: Multimedia and the Web

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM 
Lunch Break

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
7A. Papers: Video and Image Collections 
7B. Demonstrations: Enabling Hardware and Software
7P. Panel: Multimedia, Museums and Cultural Learning

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
8A. Papers: Multimedia Networking
8B. Demonstrations: Video Indexing
8P. Panel: Multimedia and Education: Magic, Myth or Miracle Cure?

7:00 PM - 10:00 PM
Interactive Demonstrations 


Thursday 
November 9

7:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Registration

9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
9A. Papers: Video in Hypermedia 
9B. Papers: Synchronization... it's about Time
9P. Panel: What's that Character Doing in your Interface? 

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
10A. Papers: LEARNing with MultiMedia
10B. Papers: Media Encoding
10P. Panel: Broadband Data Services to the Home

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM 
Lunch Break

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
11. Award Papers

3:30 PM - 5:15 PM
12. Plenary and Closing 
    Plenary Title: Follow the Artists
    Speaker: Carol Peters

================

OPENING PLENARY SPEAKER

Clifford Stoll is the bestselling author of "The
Cuckoo's Egg", the story of how he tracked and
eventually caught a German spy ring operating
over the Internet.  Involved with computer networks since 
their inception, Cliff is widely known both online and off --
as astronomer, computer security expert, and network 
maven.  Despite this, Cliff admits to being "deeply
ambivalent" about the information highway.


CLOSING PLENARY SPEAKER

Carol Peters is the Chairman and CEO of daVinci Time & Space.
daVinci Time & Space is the creator and enabler of a new form of
interactive entertainment programming -- a Time & Space=81.  This unique
invention harnesses the power of networked multimedia PCs or TV settop
boxes and sets the standard for next-generation entertainment programming.

Backed by Oak Investment Partners, Greylock Limited Partnership, and
Venrock Associates, daVinci Time & Space opened in 1993 and today has
approximately 25 employees located at our office in San Mateo, California.
daVinci Time & Space has produced an interactive television Pilot and has
begun production on a networked PC/CD-ROM Time & Space.

Prior to founding daVinci Time & Space, Carol spent four years at Silicon
Graphics (SGI) where, as director of engineering, she led the project team
that created the Iris Indigo workstation.  Following the Indigo product
ship, Carol became the director of marketing for SGI emerging markets.
Before joining SGI, Carol capped a 16-year career with Digital Equipment
Corporation (DEC) as the engineering manager of DEC's first RISC-based
workstation, the DECStation 3100.  Carol is a graduate of Harvard
University with a BS in Architectural Science.


===============

COURSES

On behalf of this year's Course Selection Committee, I am pleased to be able
to provide an outstanding selection of topical and informative courses for
attendees of ACM Multimedi'95.  The Committee sought to provide a slate of 
courses to appeal to every conference attendee.  This year's schedule of courses
represents a broad range of topics that constitute most of the "elements" of
multimedia.

In addition to the topics themselves, the courses in this year's schedule
have been designed for a broad range of needs, - for those people interested
in learning about new topics at an introductory level, to those needing
advanced, state-of-the-art information within their own field of expertise.
We have also tried to build the schedule to allow attendees to take an
introductory course first, and a second or more advanced version afterwards.

I urge everyone attending the conference to examine the course list
carefully, and to get the most out of ACM Multimedia'95 by attending at
least one course.

Sorel Reisman
Courses Chair

==================

Sunday, November  5
Full-Day Courses
 
 Course Title:  Introduction to HyTime

 Reference Number: SA1

 Course Duration: Full Day

 Course Level:  Basic
 
 Abstract 
 
 Hypermedia/Time-based Structuring Language (HyTime) is an ISO standard for
hypermedia documentation. It is an extension of Standard Generalized Markup
Language (SGML) that encodes the hypermedia structure of a document.
 
 HyTime and SGML enable the use and development of hypermedia documents in
an open and integrated environment. As such, authors are free to construct
documents according to models that fit their particular needs. Although the
resulting documents will follow many different models, they will use the
same language for defining their underlying structure. Thus, each document
will be readily integratable with documents of other models. Further, the
structures shaping these documents can be defined in a manner that is
independent of their eventual processing and presentation. This facilitates
their application to many different, and possibly unanticipated,
presentation situations.
 
 Organizer:
 
 Lloyd Rutledge received his B.S. degree from the University of
 Massachusetts at Amherst in 1987 and his Master of Science degree in
 Computer Science from the University of Massachusetts Lowell in
 1993. He is currently at UMass Lowell researching his doctoral thesis
 on the processing of HyTime. He has also served on the HyTime
 development committee, published several articles on HyTime, and
 presented HyTime tutorials at several international conferences,
 including ACM Multimedia 94.
 
========= 
  
 Course Title:  Graphic Design for User Interfaces of Multimedia and Online
 Products or Services
  
 Reference Number: SA2
 
 Course Duration:  Full Day
  
 Course Level : Intermediate
 
 Abstract
 
 This tutorial will provide proven concepts and techniques for effective,
information-oriented design of user interfaces. Many visual examples,
including detailed case studies, will provide concrete
 examples and practical guidelines for use of color, symbolism, layout,
 organization of content, metaphorical references, navigational strategies, and
 information visualization.  The following items will be addressed: What is
a user interface?
 Metaphors, Mental model, Navigation, Appearance, Interaction,Data
visualization. Designing for multiple cultures, ages, genders,
nationalities, User interface design process.  Issues will be discussed in
terms of the following Case studies:  American Airlines SABRE Online Travel
Information Network,  DTIC: Golden Gate Online Tutorial for Database
Searching,   Oracle Online Mentor: CBT GUI Design Standards,     Prodigy
Corporate GUI Design Standards, and  Random House New Media CD-ROM Titles
 
 
 Organizer:
 
 Aaron Marcus is a leading designer of user
 interfaces, multimedia, and online services. His career in computer graphics
 and graphic design spans 25 years, and his firm Aaron Marcus and Associates,
 Inc., in Emeryville, California, has helped design award-winning products for
 13 years. Mr. Marcus has written or co-written four books, including Graphic
 Design for Electronic Documents and User Interfaces, and The Cross-GUI
 Handbook. He has presented tutorials around the world at major conferences and
 corporate sites since 1980.
 
===========
 
Sunday, November 5 
Morning Courses
 
 Course Title: Introduction to Multimedia Computing and Systems
 
 Reference Number:  SA3
 
 Course Duration:  Half Day
 
 Course Level:  Basic
 
 Abstract
 
 There have been many new technical results in  the  development  of large
scale multimedia computing and communications systems. This course provides
an  introductory  survey  of
 both  practice and research of multimedia computing and systems, including
media and synchronization fundamentals, system  architecture,  middleware,
OS support, continuous media
 file systems, GUI support, and network  architectures.  This course is
recommended as a prerequisite to more advanced tutorials and the conference
program.  This course is  an  updated version of similar courses presented
at ACM Multimedia 94, IEEE Multimedia Computing 94, and to other audiences.
 
 
 Organizer:
 
 Dr. John Buford is Assoc. Prof. of Computer Science
 at the University of Massachusetts Lowell.  He is co-founder
 and director of the Distributed Multimedia Systems Lab, which
 has been active since 1990.  He is contributing editor
 of the book Multimedia Systems, chair of X3L3.3 Hypermedia/
 Multimedia Information Coding, and US head of delegation to
 ISO MHEG.  He has twenty five published papers, is on the
 editorial board for J. Multimedia Tools and Applications,
 and is a program committee member for various multimedia
 conferences.

============ 
 
 Course Title:  Systematic Design of Multimedia Applications
 
 Reference Number: SA4
 
 Course Duration:  Half Day
 
 Course Level: Intermediate
 
 Abstract
 
 The course is intended for designers of multimedia 
 applications and for users who need to develop their own 
 applications. Designing a multimedia application requires a description of
the 
 nature of the "atomic pieces" of  information; how the pieces are
organized into "consumable" objects how the objects are interrelated;  and
how they can be grouped and accessed, to describe the application's behavior
when the user will interact with it.  This course will provide, a design 
 methodology, a design model and a development environment correlated to the
design methodology to accomplish these goals
 
 The course will present and discuss the following topics:
 *  overall organization of a multimedia application and what    design is about
 *  the structuring of multimedia applications: concepts and    design
primitives
 *  the dynamics of multimedia applications: concepts and    design primitives
 *  modularization of multimedia applications
 *  how to reuse "pieces" of multimedia applications
 *  common errors in the design of multimedia applications
 *  the development cycle
 *  the development environment and tools
 
 
 Organizer:
 
 Paolo Paolini is Full Professor at University of Lecce (Italy) 
 and  Technical Director of the Hypermedia Laboratory at 
 Politecnico di Milano. He has a Master and Ph.D. in Computer Science from the 
 University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). He has 
 been active in data base modeling and systems, 
 programming languages, distributed data bases, data bases 
 views, hypermedia modeling and authoring, multimedia 
 application development tools. He has been technical responsible of various
European 
 research projects in the above fields, five of them within the 
 program ESPRIT. He served as General Chair of the ACM 
 international conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia in 
 1992 (ECHT'92). He has been member of the Program 
 Committee of various editions of VLDB, ACM ECHT, 
 and ACM HT conferences, and is currently Associate
 Editor of  ACM Transactions on Information Systems 
 (TOIS).
 
 Lecturer: 

 Franca Garzotto - Hypermedia Laboratory - Politecnico Di Milano


=======

 Course Title:  Image and Video Databases
 
 Reference Number:  SA5
 
 Course Duration:  Half Day
 
 Course Level: Intermediate 
 
 Abstract
 
 While earlier information systems were based on alphanumeric information,
there is now an increasing tendency to include image, video, and other forms
of data .  The virtue of a database system lies in its ability to
efficiently retrieve the correct piece of information. Alphanumeric keys are
used for organizing and retrieving appropriate piece of information in
databases. What would happen if the basic data format is not alphanumeric
but is an image, a video sequence, or some other signal? 
 
 This tutorial will be organized in the three sections- i) basic Issues, ii)
review, and iii) detailed examples
 to address the following related issues.  Images and other non-alphanumeric
objects can neither be decomposed into well-defined records, nor can they be
manipulated based upon any universally invariant criterion. By what
principles can the images be organized? How are image-based queries
specified? How can the concept of index keys be extended to image-based (as
opposed to text-based) entities? These issues will be addressed for data
that is in the form of video, speech or other sounds, or any other signal.
 
 Organizer:
 
 Ramesh Jain is a Professor of Electrical and Computer
 Engineering, and Computer Science and Engineering at University of
 California at San Diego.  His research interests are in multimedia
 information systems,   image databases,  machine vision, and intelligent
 systems.  He is the founding chairman of Virage, a San Diego based company
 developing systems for Visual Information Retrieval.
 
 Ramesh is  a  Fellow of IEEE, AAAI,  and Society of Photo-Optical
 Instrumentation Engineers, and member of ACM, Pattern Recognition Society, 
 Cognitive Science Society,  Optical Society of America,  and Society of 
 Manufacturing Engineers.  Currently, he is the Editor-in-Chief of IEEE
 Multimedia, and is on the editorial boards of several journals.   

===========

 
  Course Title:   An Introduction to Broadcasting for the Multimedia
Professional
 
 Reference Number:  SA6
 
 Course Duration: Half Day
 
 Course Level: Basic
 
 Abstract
 
 One of the largest markets for multimedia technology is the broadcasting 
 industry.  Understanding the broadcasting process is essential to meeting the
 broadcaster's needs.  This tutorial will introduce the radio and television 
 broadcasting process with an eye towards problem areas and multimedia 
 solutions.  We will follow various audio programs, including news, 
 commercials, and music, from creation through selection, in and out of 
 the studio, and from transmitter to receiver.  We will illustrate the 
 integration of people, equipment, and technologies that brings the radio 
 program to your receiver.  Then, we'll follow the production of television 
 programs, both live and recorded, as they make their way through the 
 broadcast chain.   Finally, we'll explore the economics of broadcasting 
 to better understand costs, savings, and income.
 
 Organizer:
 
 Charles Owen, in over a decade of experience in the broadcasting industry, 
 has held positions varying from Chief Engineer of a radio group to Vice 
 President of Clark and Associates, Ltd., a broadcast equipment manufacturer.
 He served as project leader for many large development projects in digital 
 audio, digital video, and large facility automation.  He is currently 
 Administrator of the Dartmouth Experimental Visualization Laboratory, 
 a Dartmouth Presidential Fellow, and a Ph.D. candidate in computer science
 where he is researching information retrieval in multimedia.
 
===============
 
Sunday, November 5
Afternoon Courses

 Course Title:  Understanding Distributed Multimedia Applications - The
 	Architecture, Components, and End User Benefits
 
 Reference Number:  SP1
 
 Course Duration:  Half Day
 
 Course Level:  Basic
 
 Abstract
 
 This course will address, explain, and analyze four major categories of
multimedia applications: i) real-time multimedia ( including
video conferencing , remote lectures , telemedicine ...), ii) on-line
interactive multimedia (covering teleshopping, addressable advertisement,
teletraining, movies-on-demand), iii) multimedia enabling of traditional IT
systems ( TP , DB , Office Systems), and  iv) stand alone multimedia ( PCs
/Mac with CD-drives and various titles).  In each category, discussion will
focus on the features, the architectural components, trends and issues
related to such matters as server design, network and bandwidth
requirements, protocols and standards such as MPEG MHEG HTML SGML PREMO
HyTime.   Examples of systems running or pilots under implementation around
the world will be given to illustrate the concepts. Finally, for each
application, the course will address, from a user perspective, the expected
benefits of multimedia and explore how multimedia can transform our day to
lives.
 
 Organizer: 
 
 N. Naffah has a Ph.D. in computer science from University of Paris and a
telecom engineering degree from ENST . He has done research on computer
networks and office automation at INRIA France . 
 At Bull , he is Vice President for Multimedia business . N. Naffah is a
member of the ACM , and IEEE .
 
========= 
 
 Course Title:  Structural Issues in Multimedia Design
 
 Reference Number: SP2
 
 Course Duration:  Half Day
 
 Course Level: Basic
 
 Abstract
 
 Designing end-user multimedia applications involves working
 with the structure of content: transforming content from
 linear to non-linear forms by creating interactive structures
 and designing representations of content.  This course
 focuses on the structural issues involved in designing and
 developing a range of multimedia applications, from those
 with simple structures (branching, elaboration, and index)
 to those with complex structures (interactive narratives
 and essays), and on the kinds of content representations, or
 macrostructures, that work with different kinds of structures,
 content, and media.
 
 Organizer:
 
 Linn Marks is currently working on a digital library involving
 video-on-demand from a remote, large-scale server at IBM's T.J.
 Watson Research Center.  She began her research in multimedia
 design at MIT's Project Athena in 1989.  The focus of her
 work is the development of a framework for designing interactive
 discourse structures and new media interface elements, or
 multimedia macrostructures.  She has presented tutorials on
 multimedia design at several conferences (see the World Wide Web
 Virtual SIGCHI Conference at http://drucker.cgs.edu/chivas/) and is
 co-editor of the ACM CHI'95 Electronic Proceedings.
 
 
==========
 
  Course Title: How to Read and Evaluate a Multimedia  Application
 
 Reference Number:   SP3
 
 Course Duration:  Half Day
 
 Course Level: Intermediate
 
 Abstract
 
 This course is intended for publishers, developers and "consumers" of
multimedia applications, as well as for researchers interested in evaluation
techniques of multimedia applications. 
 
 The course will present and discuss the following topics:
 *  general evaluation techniques, as they apply to multimedia  applications
 *  what design-oriented evaluation is about
 *  concepts and terms for analyzing a multimedia application
 *  design-oriented evaluation criteria
 *  how to evaluate the main design features of an application:
    the procedural steps in evaluating a multimedia application
 
 The course will mainly proceed through examples, therefore more than 10
multimedia applications will be examined. Applications will be either
commercial  CD-ROM's,  or research prototypes,  or WWW applications. Some of
the applications will probably be well known to some of the attendees; the
promise is to discover, through design-oriented evaluation,  some
(hopefully) unexpected findings about them.
 
 
 Organizer:
 
 Franca Garzotto is Research Associate  at the Department of 
 Electronics and Information, Politecnico di Milano, where 
 she presently serves as Managing Director of the Hypermedia 
 Laboratory. She has a Degree in Mathematics from the 
 University of Padova (Italy) and a Ph.D. in Computer 
 Science  from Politecnico di Milano. 
 She has being active in data base systems, conceptual 
 modeling of documents, hypermedia modeling and  
 authoring, multimedia evaluation. She has been involved in 
 various ESPRIT research projects in the above fields. She 
 has been tutorial chair of ECHT'90 and ECHT'92, and 
 member of the program committee of the conferences ACM 
 HT'91, ACM HT'93, ACM ECHT'92, ACM ECHT'94, 
 ACM Multimedia'95, ICHIM'95, and ACM HT'96. She has 
 been Program Chair of the International  Workshop on 
 Hypermedia Design held in Montpellier - France in June 
 1995, and is co-chair of the Workshop on "Evaluation 
 Methods and Quality Criteria for Multimedia Applications" to 
 be held in conjunction with ACM Multimedia'95.
 
 
 Lecturer: 

 Paolo Paolini, University Lecce And Hypermedia Laboratory - 
 Politecnico di Milano.


======== 
 
 Course Title:  Multimedia Technology in the Broadcasting Industry
 
 Reference Number:   SP4
 
 Course Duration: Half Day
 
 Course Level:  Intermediate
 
 Abstract 
 
 The broadcasting industry invented the terms "media" and "multimedia" and
 is applying new multimedia technologies to air chains at a frantic pace.
Advances such as program automation, non-linear editing, disk storage
systems, and computer graphics have seen major commercial application in
radio and television.  This tutorial will detail the broadcasting process
 with emphasis on the technologies in use and proposed.  We'll follow
signals from production to reception, examining the elements of the chain,
their use by operators and facility automation, and how they function as a
system.  The course will also examine new trends in broadcasting including 
 cable television and radio, direct broadcast satellite, subcarrier data
services, and bidirectional communications. 
 
 Organizer:
 
 Charles Owen, in over a decade of experience in the broadcasting industry, 
 has held positions varying from Chief Engineer of a radio group to Vice 
 President of Clark and Associates, Ltd., a broadcast equipment manufacturer.
 He served as project leader for many large development projects in digital 
 audio, digital video, and large facility automation.  He is currently 
 Administrator of the Dartmouth Experimental Visualization Laboratory, 
 a Dartmouth Presidential Fellow, and a Ph.D. candidate in computer science
 where he is researching information retrieval in multimedia.
 
 
 ===================== 

Course Title: Cost Justification Issues in Multimedia Project Development

Reference Number: SP5

Course Duration: Half Day

Course Level: Intermediate

Abstract

Because of significant program development issues, multimedia development
projects often require the same kind of cost justification that has
historically been necessary for the efficient development of computer
graphics-based applications.  A manager of a multimedia development project
must understand project related budget issues, including
return-of-investment (ROI), in order to deliver truly successful systems.
This tutorial will provide cost-justification models for such multimedia
projects.

A description of the history of computer graphics application development
since the mid 1960s will be presented as a comparative base for multimedia
application development.  Typical costing models, including ROI analyses,
for the development of CAD/CAM, slide-making, engineering, and science
visualization systems will be presented.  Multimedia today has many
characteristics similar to computer graphics of 20 years ago, but because of
its relative immaturity as an industry and because of its broad application
range it is still difficult to develop costing models for multimedia.
Tutorial attendees will acquire an understanding of key cost-justification
issues necessary to develop innovative multimedia applications.


Organizer

Giorgio Valle is Professor of Computer Aided Design at Universita' di
Milano, Italy.  A computer graphics pioneer, he is currently working on
Chiamabus Crema, an experimental, multimedia-based van-pooling system. Dr.
Valle's interest is in the field of relational databases and his work on
interactive cable television was instrumental in establishing the
EUROGRAPHICS Association.  For several terms he has served as Chairman of
the ACM Italian Chapter. 

=======================

Monday, November 6
Full Day Courses
 
 Course Title:  Information Highway: A Construction Survey
 
 Reference Number:  MA1
 
 Course Duration:  Full Day
 
 Course Level : Intermediate 
 
 Abstract 
 
 This course is for anyone interested in understanding, using, or deploying
exciting new
 broadband multimedia technology and services. Attendees will gain
 a thorough understanding of the end-to-end view and of the key elements
 of the  "information highway" including: broadband services, interactive
TV, and the
 Internet. The course covers system infrastructure, components, and tools.
 The emphasis is on system design issues and implications for clients,
 servers, and large-scale multimedia-enabled networks. Sample topics include:
 the WWW, interactive TV, video on demand, home banking, home automation, 
 multimedia and compression, operating system support, application support,
authoring tools, 
 MM networks,  training, education, information services, production of
multimedia documents,
 multimedia tools, hypermedia systems, and regulation, copyrights, and security.
 
 Organizer:
 
 Milan Milenkovic is a system architect in IBM's Interactive
 Broadband Services group within the Network Application Systems Division.
 Prior to joining IBM, he was in academia where he performed
 research and taught courses on operating systems, computer architecture,
 and distributed computing.  Dr. Milenkovic's publications include papers,
monograph, a college text
 "Operating Systems: Concepts and Design" (McGraw-Hill, 1992) and a
 co-edited tutorial "A Guided Tour of Multimedia Systems and Applications"
(IEEE, 1995.)

==========

  Course Title:  Desktop Animation
 
  Reference Number: MA2
 
 Course Duration:  Full Day
 
 Course Level: Basic 
 
 Abstract 
 
          In this course attendees will learn the what, why
     and how of desktop animation.  They will see what they can
     produce with the equipment they have.  The tutorial will
     cover the full range of animation from the simple to the
     complex, but the emphasis will be on learning the basic
     skills and jargon necessary to get started in this exciting
     field.  All concepts and terms are fully explained
     and in most cases, demonstrated by images and animations.
     The medium is part of the message.  The course itself is a an
     effective demonstration of how to use animations in
     presentations.  Over 40 animations and 5 video segments are
     embedded in this exciting and fast moving tutorial.
 
 Organizer:
 
        Darryl Freedman is president of VIVA Associates, a
     multimedia teaching and consulting firm.  He has taught,
     consulted and lectured worldwide in telecommunications and
     multimedia for more than seven years.  His seminars in the field
     of telecommunications and multimedia have been presented in
     the United States, Canada, Japan, Korea, the People's
     Republic of China and at major multimedia conferences.

     Darryl Freedman has a master's degree in electrical
     engineering from the Polytechnic University of New York.  He
     is currently a regular contributor to The Carolina Computer
     News, on the advisory board for The School of Communications
     Arts, an instructor for computer animation at the Institute
     of Academic Technology and a member of the IEEE.
 
  
========
Monday, November 6
Morning Courses
 
Course Title:  Background for Digital Libraries: Information Retrieval And
 Hypertext
 
 Reference Number:  MA3
 
 Course Duration:  Half Day
 
 Course Level:  Basic 
 
 Abstract 
 
 This course will provide an introduction to information retrieval (IR)  and
hypertext (HT), which will act as a background for the afternoon course
Research Issues and Design Issues  for  Digital Libraries  as well as work
in: content-based retrieval, hypermedia,  networked information, educational
courseware, and related technologies.  Topics that will be addressed include
the problems, models, design
  issues, current systems and research interests in the fields of IR and
  HT.   Course attendees will learn how to navigate and reuse the WWW-based
  courseware on IR and HT and Multimedia available from Virginia Tech as
well as to appreciate the power  of the KMS hypertext system.  They will be
able to ask and discuss
  questions with the current and past SIG chairs of SIGIR and SIGLINK,
  respectively, and to talk with them about techniques and implementation
  considerations regarding building IR and HT systems and information
  collections.  They will learn where to find out more about concerns
regarding human-computer interaction as well as algorithms. 
 
 
 Organizer:
 
 Edward A. Fox  is Professor of Computer Science and Associate Director for
 Research at the Computing Center, Virginia Tech.  He has been PI on
 over 40 grants and now directs "Interactive Learning with a Digital
 Library in Computer Science."  He has helped prepare one videotape
 documentary, three CD-ROMs, and over 100 book chapters or journal or
 conference papers.  He is Chair of the ACM SIG on Information
 Retrieval and founder of the ACM Multimedia Conferences series.
 
 Lecturer:  

 Robert Akscyn, President of Knowledge Systems.
 
=========
 
  Course Title:  Packet Video: Video over IP and ATM Networks
 
 Reference Number:   MA4
 
 Course Duration:  Half Day
 
 Course Level:  Intermediate

 Abstract
 
 The purpose of this course is to explain the principles of real-time
 video coding and transfer across ATM and IP networks. We will follow
 the video signal from the camera across the network to the monitor and
 step through all the functions needed along the way. Coding,
 application layer framing, rate-control, and resource allocation will
 be explained, as well as handling of loss, errors, and delay
 variations on the receiver side.  Course topics will include; the use of
real-time video in multimedia , applications,  variable-rate and
constant-rate coding, modeling and characterization of variable bit-rate ,
video sources, resource allocation, handling of jitter and loss, perceptual
quality of service, and related research issues.
 
Organizer:
 
 Gunnar Karlsson holds a MS from Chalmers University of Technology and
 a Ph.D. from Columbia University.  His thesis was on video coding for
 packet-switched networks.  Dr. Karlsson is a researcher at the Swedish
Institute of Computer Science
 (SICS), and is on the faculty of the Royal Institute of Technology.
 Prior to joining SICS in 1992, he worked three years at the IBM Zurich
 Research Laboratory.  He has been the first project leader of the Stockholm
Gigabit Network.

============

  Course Title:  Real-Time Scheduling Technology for Continuous Multimedia
 Applications
 
 Reference Number: MA5
 
 Course Duration:  Half Day
 
 Course Level:  Intermediate 
 
 Abstract 
 
 Real-time scheduling is critical for multimedia systems to meet the timing
 constraints of individual media streams, optimize system performance across
 concurrent streams as a whole, and support graceful performance degradation
 in case of resource contention. This course presents design principles and
 state-of-the-art techniques for scheduling system entities (thread, I/O
 processes, etc.) over system resources (CPU, disk I/O, etc.) for execution of
 continuous multimedia applications.   The course is intended for
researchers and practitioners who want to capture recent research results
and new research challenges in this area, get insights into real-time
scheduling fundamentals, and/or discuss system implementation techniques and
existing obstacles in using off-the-shelf operating systems and hardware
platforms.  A multimedia data management system prototype will be used to
demonstrate the effects of many of the real-time scheduling and real-time
software methodologies presented in this course. 
 
 Organizer:
 
 Dr. Jim Huang is a principal research scientist at Honeywell Technology
Center and has recently been doing research and development on multimedia
systems, real-time systems, real-time database systems, and multidatabase
systems for industrial process control and military applications. He is an
adjunct
 faculty of the University of Minnesota and the University of St. Thomas. He
co-chaired the IEEE Real-Time Applications Workshop'94 and served on
several program committees of real-time and multimedia systems conferences. 

===========
 
 Course Title:  Designing University Courses in Interactive Multimedia
 
 Reference Number:  MA6
 
 Course Duration: Half Day
 
 Course Level: Intermediate
 
 Abstract
 
 This course is a must for anyone who is thinking of incorporating
multimedia into their curriculum or their business. Although this course
will be Mac based, the concepts can be applied to any platform. Sample
software and examples of student portfolios will be presented on the Mac.
Examples of assignments and class handouts will be included. Based on a
successful model of courses in interactive multimedia, this course is
designed to address the  questions:
 1. Is there a corpus of material that can be identified and presented to
students in an academic setting?
 2. What requirements should be in place for students taking a first
multimedia course?
 3. How can that corpus - if it exists - be ordered into a meaningful program?
 4. What requirements should be in place for students pursuing such a program?
 5. How does that material relate to, or augment, current  undergraduate and
graduate programs in computer science?
 6. How can the team nature of "real world" interactive multimedia projects
be accommodated in  a computer science class to allow students of various
backgrounds to participate?
 7. What types of laboratory environments need to be created?
 
 Organizer:
 
 Dr. Kieffer is an assistant professor of computer science in the Computer
Science Department, School of Mathematics, Science and Technology, at
Eastern Washington University.  Dr. Kieffer's research interests are in the
area of computer literacy, educational uses of computers and interactive
multimedia.  She is a member of the Association for the Advancement of
Computing in Education (AACE), Northwest Council for Computer Education
(NCEE), IEEE and ACM, and the SIGs on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE)
and Computer Uses in Education (SIGCUE).
 
 Lecturer: 

 Rachelle Heller, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer
Science, The George Washington University, Washington DC  20052.
 
========== 
  
Monday, November 6
Afternoon Courses
 
 
 Course Title:  Writing Interactive Multimedia: Creative and Critical Strategies
 
 Reference Number:  MP1
 
 Course Duration:  Half Day
 
 Course Level:  Basic 
 
 Abstract
 
 In this tutorial, participants will help formulate some basic principles
for writing for the interactive, multimedia environment.  This course will
1) attempt to describe interactive multimedia as a medium similar to and yet
distinct from film, television, or print; 2) explain roles and challenges
for the writer; and 3) introduce creative and critical ways to approach the
medium through examples and group exercises.    The course is geared to
those with previous writing experience who are new to multimedia and those
with multimedia experience who have little formal training in writing.
 
 Organizer:
 
 Martin Schecter taught composition, creative writing, and cultural studies as
 an assistant professor of English at Drake University from 1992 - 1994.
 Previously, he worked as a senior medical writer in Princeton, NJ. He has his
 M.F.A. in fiction writing from the University of Arizona and has published
 short fiction, essays, criticism and a novel. He currently manages an
 educational CD-ROM project and is at work on a textbook on fiction writing.
 
 ==========
 
 Course Title:  Background for Digital Libraries: Information Retrieval and
 Hypertext
 
 Reference Number:  MP2
 
 Course Duration:  Half Day
 
 Course Level:  Intermediate 
 
 Abstract 
 
 This course will focus on the popular emerging field of  Digital Libraries
(DLs) and for people new to this field will be based upon issues presented
in the preparatory morning course, "Background for Digital Libraries:
Information Retrieval and Hypertext."  Those who are at an  intermediate
level, should have some background in information retrieval, hypertext,
hypermedia, or library or information science.  Attendees at an advanced
level will be interested in the perspective of the co-organizers, who led
editing of the April 1995 CACM issue  on DLs.
 
 Attendees will learn about a number of important DL projects, and be
prepared to help design and implement future DLs.  They should understand
the main research issues regarding DLs, and know where to obtain guidance on
the key technologies involved.  They will learn about the results of May,
October and November 1995  workshops about DLs, as well as others dating
back to 1991. They will  see demonstrations regarding ACM's digital library
and learn about progress in scaling up the KMS system to support very large DLs.
 
 
 Organizer:
 
 Edward A. Fox  is Professor of Computer Science and Associate Director for
 Research at the Computing Center, Virginia Tech.  He has been PI on
 over 40 grants and now directs "Interactive Learning with a Digital
 Library in Computer Science."  He has helped prepare one videotape
 documentary, three CD-ROMs, and over 100 book chapters or journal or
 conference papers.  He is Chair of the ACM SIG on Information
 Retrieval and founder of the ACM Multimedia Conferences series.
 
 Lecturer:  

 Robert Akscyn, President of Knowledge Systems.
 
 =============
 
 Course Title:  Image and Video Compression Standards: Algorithms and Architectures
 
 Reference Number:  MP3
 
 Course Duration:  half day
 
 Course Level: Basic 
 
 Abstract
 
        Compression is one of the core technologies in video
        teleconferencing, digital television, and a number of
        multimedia applications.  This tutorial provides an
        introductory overview of the principles of image and video
        compression standards and their hardware implementation.
        The tutorial will be in two parts.  The first part reviews
        the key principles in image compression and acquaints the
        audience with transform coding, motion estimation and
        compensation, and entropy coding.  In this part, an overview
        of the JPEG, MPEG and H.261 image and video compression
        standards will be presented.  A short overview of the MPEG
        audio and Dolby AC-3 algorithms will also be presented.
        The second part of the tutorial presents an overview of the latest
        hardware implementations in custom and programmable video
        processors.
 
 
  Organizer:
 
        Konstantinos Konstantinides received his Ph.D. degree 
        in electrical engineering from the University of California, Los 
        Angeles, in 1985.  He is currently a  member of the technical
	staff at  Hewlett-Packard
        Laboratories, in Palo Alto where he is involved in various research
	projects in  digital signal and image processing and compression.  
	He is a Senior member of the IEEE and a member of the IEEE
        Technical  Committee  on the design and implementation of   digital
	signal processors.
 
 Lecturer:

 Vasudev Bhaskaran, Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, MS 3U, PO Box 10490
 Palo Alto, CA 94303.
 
=============
 
 Course Title:  Resource Management in Distributed Video Server Environments
 
 Reference Number:  MP4
 
 Course Duration:  Half Day
 
 Course Level: Intermediate 
 
 Abstract 
 
 This tutorial, which is for both practitioners and researchers,
 provides an overview of resource management in a
 distributed video server cluster consisting of many interconnected
 processing and storage nodes. The goal is to provide casual
 participants with an overview of video server design issues as well as
 to provide sophisticated designers with new and timely information
 about this rapidly evolving area.  Practitioners will learn practical and
 new algorithms and design principles. Researchers will additionally
 benefit from a broad overview of this area. Case studies will be presented
that will be
 of interest to both groups.  An extensive bibliography of recent work will
also be provided.
 
 
 
 Organizer:
 
 Dr. Asit Dan is a Research Staff Member at the IBM Watson Research
 Center working on the design and development of distributed video
 server architectures. He has authored several papers and holds many
 patents in this area. His earlier work on databases received an ACM
 Dissertation award and is published by the MIT Press.
 
 
 Lecturer: 
 
 Dr. Dinkar Sitaram, IBM Research Division, H4-A04, PO Box 704,
Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
  
============== 

Course Title:  MHEG: An ISO Standard for Multimedia and Hypermedia
 Information Delivery
 
 Reference Number:  MP5
 
 Course Duration:  Half Day
 
 Course Level:  Advanced 
 
 Abstract 
 
         MHEG is  ISO 13522, a  specification  for  platform-independent
delivery  of  interactive multimedia and hyper-
 media content in networked environments. MHEG is near  standardization,
and  has  close ties with the MPEG-2 Transport Stream and MPEG-2 DSM-CC
which are  expected  to  be  widely used  in  set-top  box and other
consumer entertainment devices. MHEG also includes a  platform-independent
specification for scriptware application delivery. This tutorial provides an
in-depth discussion of MHEG part  1  (object  interchange) and part 3
(scriptware interchange). We also present details of  implementation  issues
for  MHEG  engines,  and recommendations  for  supporting  MHEG in authoring
environments.
 
 Organizer:
 
 Dr. John Buford is Assoc. Prof. of Computer Science
 at the University of Massachusetts Lowell.  He is co-founder
 and director the Distributed Multimedia Systems Lab, which
 has been active since 1990.  He is contributing editor
 of the book Multimedia Systems, chair of X3L3.3 Hypermedia/Multimedia
Information Coding, and US head of delegation to
 ISO MHEG.  He has 25 published papers, is on the
 editorial board for J. Multimedia Tools and Applications,
 and is a program committee member for various multimedia
 conferences.
 
=================
 
WORKSHOPS

ACM Multimedia'95 is proud to be hosting a number of full-day, in-depth
workshops on topics of great current interest to the members of the
multimedia research community. Although participation in a workshop
is by invitation only, most still have slots available. So if you see
one to which you think you could make a contribution, don't hesitate
to contact the organizer for more information. Please note that all
workshop attendees are expected to register for the conference, and
must in addition pay a workshop fee of $50 which will be collected by
the organizer. Take advantage of this unique opportunity to get the
most out of ACM Multimedia'95!

Ephraim P. Glinert
Workshops Chair

====================

     Saturday, November 4
     W1
     Full Day

     Effective Abstractions in Multimedia Layout, Presentation and
     Interaction


 Organizers:

     Isabel Cruz, Tufts University
     Joseph Marks, Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories
     Kent Wittenburg, Bell Communications Research


     This workshop is concerned with abstract representations and methods
     for structuring of multimedia/hypermedia documents and interactions.
     We will focus on concepts and techniques that are useful for organizing
     heterogeneous information from the perspective of both end-user delivery
     and authoring. Problems to be discussed include spatial layout for
     visual presentation; temporal layout for presentation using animation
     and audio; determination of page content, linking structure and index
     structure for hypermedia documents; filtering, generalization, and
     customization of information in multimedia/hypermedia applications; and
     synergistic combination of media. More information may be found on the
     World Wide Web at http://www.cs.tufts.edu/~isabel/mmws.html.


     Contact Person:

     Dr. Kent Wittenburg
     Bellcore, Rm. MRE 2A-347
     445 South Street
     Morristown, NJ 07962

     E-mail:   kentw@bellcore.com
     Phone:    +1-201-829-4382
     Fax:      +1-201-829-5981

===========

     Saturday, November 4
     W2
     Full Day

     Integrating Audio and Visual Media
  
  Organizer:

     Meera Blattner, University of California at Davis and
                     Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory


     Non-speech audio, speech, video, and graphics are the output media of
     multimedia interfaces. For historical reasons, audio and visual media
     have not been integrated well in the human-computer interface, although
     these modalities are integrated in our real world experience. Can we
     build a systematic foundation for understanding the interpretation of
     information in both the auditory and visual domains together? To what
     other disciplines can we turn to learn how to design good multimedia
     interfaces? What examples do we have now of good integration in the
     auditory and visual domains? Do we attempt to mimic the real world, or
     should we strive to use media in new ways (for example, to use sound
     to replace touch)?


     Contact Person:

     Professor Meera M. Blattner, L-540
     Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
     P. O. Box 808
     Livermore, CA 94550

     E-mail:   blattner@llnl.gov
     Phone:    +1-510-422-3503
     Fax:      +1-510-423-4139


===========


     Saturday, November 4
     W3
     Full Day

     Evaluation Methods and Quality Criteria for Multimedia Applications

 Organizers:

     Franca Garzotto, Politecnico di Milano
     Manfred Thuering, BIFOA / University of Cologne


     To support effective evaluation of multimedia applications and product
     development, it is necessary to first define what must be evaluated,
     what constitute reasonable quality criteria, which metrics are suitable
     for measuring them, which evaluation procedures should be applied, and
     which existing standards can be employed. These issues will be discussed
     during the workshop by people from diverse backgrounds (researchers,
     application developers, multimedia publishers, distributors, and product
     managers), so that all may come away with a better understanding of
     evaluation criteria, quality assessment, and methods for systematic
     testing.


     Contact Person:

     Dr. Franca Garzotto
     Hypermedia Laboratory
     Dept. of Electronics and Information
     Politecnico di Milano
     Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32
     I-20133 Milano, Italy

     E-mail:   garzotto@elet.polimi.it
     Phone:    +39-2-23993520
     Fax:      +39-2-23993411


===========

     Saturday, November 4
     W4
     Full Day

     NSF Research on Digital Libraries

 Organizer:

     Edward Fox, Virginia Tech


     The goal of this workshop is to produce a set of recommendations to
     the R&D community regarding high impact topics crucial for digital
     libraries. We will focus on three issues: the desirability of holding
     a ``competition'' similar to the TREC (Text REtrieval Conference) or
     MUC (Message Understanding) events; identification of research crucial
     to the success of digital libraries and which is not now supported;
     and possible mechanisms for sharing - perhaps through some type of
     clearing house - tools, collections and other results, so that small
     research teams can more easily build upon the findings of others and
     so contribute. The workshop will lead to a report that will be
     disseminated widely on paper as well as electronically. Community
     response to recommendations in the report should lead to
     participation of more research teams that will as a result make
     additional contributions to this important NII area.


     Contact Person:

     Professor Edward A. Fox
     Dept. of Computer Science
     562 McBryde Hall
     Virginia Tech
     Blacksburg, VA 24061

     E-mail:   fox@vt.edu
     Phone:    +1-703-231-5113
     Fax:      +1-703-231-6075

=======================


     Friday, November 10
     W5
     Full Day

     Adaptive Multimedia Technologies for People with Disabilities

 Organizers:

     Shi-Kuo Chang, University of Pittsburgh
     Ephraim Glinert, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute


     As multimedia interfaces become ubiquitous, there is a danger that the
     requirement of using all the senses may deny additional communities
     access to information. In this workshop we will explore and define the
     future technologies needed to support multiple media choices that are
     selectable on several levels, so that the most appropriate media can be
     provided to each user. Topics discussed will include: use of multimedia
     in teaching and researching sign languages; virtual reality environments
     for people with disabilities; adapting GUIs for blind users; nonvisual
     representations for information; storage standards for sophisticated
     closed captioning and descriptive accompanying audio. The workshop is
     scheduled to immediately follow the conference, so that late-breaking
     developments can be addressed in the discussions. Attendees will be
     selected to include a mixture of experts on multimedia, experts in
     helping people with disabilities, and scientists with disabilities.


     Contact Person:

     Professor Shi-Kuo Chang
     Dept. of Computer Science
     University of Pittsburgh
     Pittsburgh, PA 15260

     E-mail:   chang@cs.pitt.edu
     Phone:    +1-708-679-3135 thru August 31, then +1-412-624-8423
     Fax:      +1-708-679-3166 thru August 31, then +1-412-624-8465

===========


     Friday, November 10
     W6
     Full Day

     Intellectual Property Rights Management in the Electronic
     Information Society: A European Initiative in the ESPRIT Programme

 Organizer:

     Costantino Thanos, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa


     The objective of this workshop is to present the most promising
     results of a number of related research projects conducted by the
     European ESPRIT program during the past 5 years, and which together
     defined a generic model for the management in an electronic society
     of intellectual property rights and copyright issues. Four discussion
     areas, each to be introduced by an expert in the field, are planned:
     information technology industries; publishing; museums; and libraries.
     Topics to be covered will include: overview of the various projects;
     the CITED model; technologies and implementations; the publisher-
     university relationship; numeric TV broadcasting; CD-ROM publishing;
     critical issues for educational and library systems; fee collecting
     and licensing agencies; multimedia authoring; requirements for
     standardization and infrastructure. We will conclude with an open
     discussion on the impact of this work on the business community.


     Contact Person:

     Dr. Costantino Thanos
     Istituto di Elaborazione dell'Informazione
     Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche
     Via S. Maria 46
     I-56126 Pisa, Italy

     E-mail:   thanos@iei.pi.cnr.it
     Phone:    +39-50-593492
     Fax:      +39-50-554342

=============

     Friday, November 10
     W7
     Full Day

     Multimedia Database Management Systems

 Organizers:

     Bruce Berra, Syracuse University
     Kingsley Nwosu, AT&T
     Bhavani Thuraisingham, MITRE Corporation


     This workshop will investigate issues in designing and developing
     M-DBMSs. A M-DBMS which supports distributed applications should
     integrate the two technologies of distributed/heterogeneous
     databases and multimedia data management. This integration is one
     of the greatest challenges faced by information systems researchers
     and developers, and will be the main focus of this workshop. Topics
     to be discussed include the following: data models; storage structures;
     system, schema and functional architectures; retrieval and update
     algorithms; metadata management for multimedia databases. Attendees
     will be chosen to include a mixture of people from the database and
     multimedia information systems communities.


     Contact Person:

     Dr. Bhavani Thuraisingham
     The MITRE Corporation, K329
     Burlington Road
     Bedford, MA 01730

     E-mail:   thura@mitre.org
     Phone:    +1-617-271-8873
     Fax:      +1-617-271-2352

=================

TECHNICAL PROGRAM


Tuesday, November 7

8:45 AM - 10:30 AM

1. Opening and Plenary
   Opening Plenary: Silicon Snake Oil: What Multimedia is Offering
   Speaker: Clifford Stoll

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

2A. Papers: Video Indexing and Retrieval

Video parsing, retrieval and browsing: An integrated and content-based solution
H.J. Zhang, C.Y. Low, S.W. Smoliar and D. Zhong, National University of
Singapore

An intuitive and efficient access interface to real-time incoming video based
on automatic indexing
Yukinobu Taniguchi, Akihito Akutsu, Yoshinobu Tonomura and Hiroshi Hamada,
NTT Human Interface Laboratories, Japan

Automatic content-based retrieval of broadcast news
M. G. Brown, J. T. Foote, G. J. F. Jones, K. Sparck Jones and S. J. Young,
Olivetti Research Limited and Cambridge University, UK

2B. Papers: Supporting Collaboration Environments

Dealing with timing variability in the playback of interactive session
recordings
Nelson R. Manohar and Atul Prakash, University of Michigan

Multimedia application sharing in a heterogeneous environment
Klaus H. Wolf, Konrad Froitzheim and Peter Schulthess,
University of Ulm, Germany

Automating envisionment of virtual meeting room histories
Allen Ginsberg and Sid Ahuja, AT&T Bell Laboratories

2P. Panel: The Information Superhighway:
         Electronic Democracy or Electronic Tranquilizer?
    Chair: Barbara Simons, IBM Almaden


Events are moving so rapidly with respect to the Information Superhighway
or National Information Infrastructure (NII) that it's almost impossible
to write an abstract dealing with policy issues several months in
advance of an event.  Laws are being proposed (as of this writing,
the Exon Amendment has been incorporated into the Telecommunications
Bill, but the final vote has not yet been taken), books are being
written by authors with very diverse views such as Clifford Stoll and
Nicholas Negroponte, large sums of money are being invested, and major
pronouncements are being made.  Yet the terms of the discussions tend
to be vague.  How does the Internet relate to this yet-to-be-defined NII?
Who will have access and to what?  How will it be used?  What are the
potential abuses and how will we be protected from them?

This panel will discuss current policy issues and concerns.
We hope to have considerable input from the audience.


2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

3A. Papers: Cyber Communities

The Jupiter audio/video architecture: secure multimedia in network places
Pavel Curtis, Michael Dixon, Ron Frederick and David A. Nichols, Xerox PARC

Low disturbance audio for awareness and privacy in media space applications
Ian Smith and Scott E. Hudson, Georgia Institute of Technology

Visual Who: Animating the affinities and activities of an electronic community
Judith S. Donath, MIT Media Lab


3B. Papers: Multimedia Storage Servers

Disk farms vs. storage hierarchies for video service
Ann L. Chervenak, David A. Patterson and Randy H. Katz,
Georgia Institute of Technology and University of California, Berkeley

Using rotational mirrored declustering for replica placement in a
disk-array-based video server
Ming-Syan Chen, Hui-I Hsiao, Chung-Sheng Li and Philip S. Yu,
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center

Efficient support for scan operations in video servers
Prashant J. Shenoy and Harrick M. Vin, University of Texas at Austin

3P. Panel: Curriculum, Education and Training about Multimedia
    Chair: Ed Fox, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

There is a growing demand for people with knowledge and skills in
the areas of multimedia information, systems, and technology.
Universities are just beginning to help in this regard, and
a curriculum effort by SIGMM may be in order to provide guidance
and support.  This panel will lead a discussion with the audience
regarding when and how to develop such a curriculum, dealing with
issues such as:
* At what level should courses be offered (senior, graduate, ...);
* Should such courses be taught by CS, Arts, Communications,
     or other disciplines --- or by interdisciplinary teams?
* What are the needs of industry --- research, development ---
     that should be concentrated upon?
* What courseware, toolkits, demonstrations, online resources,
     textbooks, projects, etc. can assist with education?


4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

4A. Papers: Authoring Flexible Documents

Multimedia documents with elastic time
Michelle Y. Kim and Junehwa Song, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center

Commands as media: design and implementation of a command stream
Jonathan L. Herlocker and Joseph A. Konstan, University of Minnesota

Control layer primitives for the layered multimedia data model
Michael J. Wynblatt and Gary Schloss, SUNY at Stony Brook

4B. Papers: Video Processing

A resolution independent video language
Jonathan Swartz and Brian C. Smith, Cornell University

A robust method for detecting cuts and dissolves in video sequences
Kevin Mai, Justin Miller and Ramin Zabih, Cornell University

An architecture for multiple perspective interactive video
Patrick H. Kelly, Arun Katkere, Don Y. Kuramura, Saied Moezzi, Shankar
Chatterjee and Ramesh Jain, University of California, San Diego

4P. Panel: Multimedia on a Shoestring: Low Bandwidth Implementations
    Chair: John Danskin, Dartmouth College

If Multimedia is to accessible to the masses, it will have to work across
slow networks like the standard telephone system. We are also seeing a
tremendous increase in wireless (cellular modem) applications, especially
for personal digital assistants. These machines present a tremendous new
market for the multimedia community, but the network bandwidth problems
associated with these machines are severe.

We will discuss problems, solutions and approaches associated with
implementing multimedia applications over low bandwidth network
connections such as cellular modems and phone lines.

6:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Off-site conference reception, Yerba Buena Gardens

Wednesday, November 8

9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

5A. Papers: Speech and Audio Interfaces

Surfing the Web by voice
Charles T. Hemphill and Philip R. Thrift, Texas Instruments

Hearing Aid: Adding verbal hints to a learning interface
Elizabeth Stoehr and Henry Lieberman, MIT Media Lab

Query by humming: Musical information retrieval in an audio database
Asif Ghias, Jonathan Logan, David Chamberlin and Brian C. Smith,
Cornell University

5D. Demonstrations: Networked Video

MBONE VCR - A video conference recorder for the MBONE
Wieland Holfelder, ICSI

A distributed real-time MPEG audio video player
Shanwei Cen and Jonathan Walpole, Oregon Graduate Institute

5P. Panel: Personal Narrative Spaces
    Chair: Sha Xin Wei, Stanford University

Emerging multimedia technologies have blurred the lines between
classically distinct categories of theater and narrative:
stage-spaces in which humans and artifacts interact, and spaces of
symbols like a page of text or a digital video to be interpreted by
an observer.   This panel brings together practitioners to take stock
of the state of the art and point out some exciting lines of work in
the field of interactive media.

What will we face do when we freely inter-mix computational artifacts
with human agents in our living, writing or performance spaces?  How
will we make sense of such hybrid spaces and how will we share these
interpretations?

These questions are intimately tied with techno-scientific issues as
well as literary and social issues.    How should media models evolve
to meet the needs of these personal narrative spaces?    What are
some design limitations of our tools or frameworks?   What are some
potential functions that inhabitants, browsers, composers, and
architects can tap in emerging frameworks?  What are some worthy
challenges for researchers and developers interested in interactive
multimedia?


11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

6A. Papers: Multimedia Network Tools

Managing real-time services in multimedia networks using
dynamic visualization and high-level controls
Mun Choon Chan, Giovanni Pacifici and Rolf Stadler, Columbia University

An application level video gateway
Elan Amir, Steven McCanne and Hui Zhang,
University of California, Berkeley and Carnegie Mellon University

Multimedia traffic analysis using CHITRA95
Marc Abrams, Stephen Williams, Ghaleb Abdulla, Shashin Patel, Randy Ribler and
Edward A. Fox, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

6D. Demonstrations: Video-centric Information Systems

GUARDIAN: A knowledge-based home health-care system for children with leukemia
Michelle Y. Kim, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center

CITYQUILT: A navigable movie
Tirtza Even

6P. Panel: Multimedia and the Web
    Chair: Allan Kuchinsky, Hewlett Packard

While the perceived benefits networked multimedia are significant, there
are also considerable challenges to bringing this vision to fruition in
the mass market.  At this point, it seems plausible that the web will
evolve as a primary delivery vehicle for multimedia. However, there are
a number of obstacles to this evolution for the Web.  One formidable
problem is that we are trying to blend a number of different authoring
paradigms, communities, and traditions, many of which are conflicting.
There are many fundamental inconsistencies, for example, between the
document-centric paradigm of HTML and the presentation-centric paradigm
of multimedia authoring tools such as Director.   This panel explores
differing perspectives on the merging of multimedia and the Web.   The
goal is to determine the most plausible approaches for blending the
interactivity of the CD-ROM environment with the networked, interlinked
nature of the Web.


2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

7A. Papers: Video and Image Collections

Integrated video archive tools
Rune Hjelsvold, Stein Langorgen, Roger Midtstraum and Olav Sandsta,
Norwegian Institute of Technology, Norway

Automatic recognition of film genres
Stephan Fischer, Rainer Lienhart and Wolfgang Effelsberg,
University of Mannheim, Germany

An integrated color-spatial approach to content-based image retrieval
Wynne Hsu, T.S. Chua and H.K. Pung, National University of Singapore

7D. Demonstrations: Enabling Hardware and Software

Montage multipoint audio and video
S.R. Ahuja and R.D. Gaglianello, AT&T Bell Laboratories

The programmers' playground demo
T. Paul McCartney, Kenneth J. Goldman and Bala Swaminathan,
Washington University

7P. Panel: Museums, Multimedia, and Cultural Learning
    Co-Chairs: Ranjit Makkuni, Xerox PARC and Mike Sipusik, UC Berkeley

Museums provide people with a rich setting
for cultural learning.  Museums are the repositories of
artifacts from diverse cultures.  However, we should not
forget that these artifacts are located in-situ a cultural
practice, and need to be seen in their original cultural
context where interrelations between form, process, myth,
symbol, philosophy, ritual and celebration get articulated.
Modern multimedia systems in museums have begun to address
the issues of "re-contextualising" the cultural artifact
in its original context.  Members of the panel will show
examples of cultural learning systems, and the design
challenges of re-contextualisation.

Panelists consist of designers of learning systems, education
researchers, museum administrators.


4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

8A. Papers: Multimedia Networking

Fast lossy Internet image transmission
Geoffrey M. Davis and John M. Danskin, Dartmouth College

A reliable dissemination protocol for interactive collaborative applications
Rajendra Yavatkar, James Griffioen and Madhu Sudan, University of Kentucky

A generalized admissions control strategy for heterogeneous, distributed
multimedia systems
Saurav Chatterjee and Jay Strosnider, Carnegie Mellon University

8A. Demonstrations: Video Indexing

Automating the creation of a digital video library
Michael A. Smith and Michael Christel, Carnegie Mellon University

A video parsing, indexing, and retrieval system
H.J. Zhang, J.H. Wu, and C.Y. Low, National University of Singapore

8P. Panel: Multimedia and Education: Magic, Myth or Miracle Cure?
    Chair: Rachelle Heller, George Washington University

The media has latched onto the use of multimedia in education. This panel
will attempt to question the issues beyond the hype - is it an
appropriate atmosphere in which to offer educational experiences or does
it reinforce the 30 second sound byte mentality, what is it about multimedia
that makes it a tool for all learners or is it a superficial educational
environment? Is it just for kids or will all learners benefit from using
multimedia? These and other questions will be addressed by this lively
panel of theorists and practitioners.



7:00 PM - 10:00 PM

Interactive Demonstrations

Thursday, November 9

9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

9A. Papers: Video in Hypermedia

ConText:  Towards the evolving documentary
Glorianna Davenport and Michael Murtaugh, MIT Media Lab

Surfing the movie space: advanced navigation in movie-only hypermedia
Joerg Geissler, GMD-IPSI, Germany

Automated authoring of hypermedia documents of video programs
Behzad Shahraray and David C. Gibbon, AT&T Bell Laboratories

9B. Papers: Synchronization... it's about Time

Scheduling MPEG-compressed video streams with firm deadline constraints
Ching-Chih Han and Kang G. Shin, University of Michigan

Low-level multimedia synchronization algorithms on broadband networks
Miguel Correia and Paulo Pinto, INESC and IST, Portugal

Coordinating heterogeneous time-based media between independent applications
Scott Flinn and Kellogg S. Booth, University of British Columbia, Canada

9P. Panel: What's that Character doing in your Interface?
    Chair: Abbe Don, Abbe Don Interactive Inc.

Until recently, the discussion of the use of characters in the interface
centered on the old question to anthropomorphize or not to
anthropomorphize the interface. With the appearance of Microsoft's "social
interface" in the form of Bob and his pals, with Fujitsu's use of avatars
in their online service "Habitat," and with millions of people representing
themselves daily in various contexts on the Internet, the old discussion
centering on the wonders or pitfalls of anthropomorphism seems moot.
Instead, many multimedia designers, producers, and software engineers find
themselves accepting the use of characters in the interface and are now
grappling with a more difficult set of issues regarding implementation.
These questions include:

*  What is the most appropriate representation for a particular application or audience?
*  Why are some characters accepted while others are dismissed as "too cute?"
*  How do you match back-end functionality with the promises of the front-end
     representation?
*  What tools are needed to enable users to create their own characters or agents?
*  If a character acts autonomously, how do you explain the action to the user?
*  Can characters be truly adaptive to users' needs?
*  Can characters be truly adaptive within a story or entertainment context?
*  Can characters and 'bots be used effectively on the World Wide Web?



11:00 AM - 12:30 PM 

10A. Papers: LEARNing with MultiMedia

The PsyCLE Project: educational multimedia for conceptual understanding
Nick Hammond, Jean McKendree, Will Reader, Annie Trapp and Peter Scott,
University of York and University of Sheffield, UK

pianoFORTE: A system for piano education beyond notation literacy
Stephen W. Smoliar, John A. Waterworth and Peter R. Kellock,
National University of Singapore and Umea University, Sweden

eMMaC: Knowledge-based color critiquing support for novice multimedia authors
Kumiyo Nakakoji, Brent N. Reeves, Atsushi Aoki, Hironobu Suzuki and Kazunori
Mizushima,
MITI, Japan; Software Research Associates, Inc. and University of Colorado

10B. Papers: Media Encoding

Model-based motion estimation for synthetic animations
Maneesh Agrawala, Andrew C. Beers and Navin Chaddha, Stanford University

Inner-block operations on compressed images
Bo Shen and Ishwar K. Sethi, Wayne State University

Direct manipulation of MPEG compressed digital audio
M. Alexander Broadhead and Charles B. Owen, Dartmouth College

10P. Panel: Broadband Data Services to the Home
      Chair: Gita Gopal, HP Laboratories

The ubiquitous deployment of broadband access architectures to the home,
coupled with an access-bandwidth technology discontinuity in the form of
high-speed cable modems, will cause an explosion in broadband interactive data
services to the home. The panel speakers will discuss services enabled by cable
modems, the service software that is needed to provide these services, and the
differences between this environment and other candidates for the NII including
Video-On-Demand, and the Internet.


2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

11. Award Papers

Best Student Paper:

vic:  A flexible framework for packet video
Steven McCanne and Van Jacobson, University of California, Berkeley

Best Paper:

A confederation of tools for capturing and accessing collaborative activity
Scott Minneman, Steve Harrison, Bill Janssen, Gordon Kurtenbach, Thomas Moran,
Ian Smith and Bill van Melle,
Xerox PARC


3:30 PM - 5:15 PM

12. Plenary and Closing
    Closing Plenary: Follow the Artists
    Speaker: Carol Peters, daVinci Time & Space

High speed computing, multimedia capabilities, high speed networks, and
authoring tools are the technical enablers of a new design language that
will express new forms of entertainment, education, and information.  This
design language will allow visual, sound, and literary artists to speak
through the new technology.  To learn how to speak the language, the
artists must start their lessons now.  As partners to the artists, the
technologists must learn how to listen to, follow, and create mechanisms
for the artists.  Thus will technologists discover how to specify and make
accessible the new design language.  Thus will the artists speak and
invent.  Technologists in service to artists will allow the new art forms
to speak through the technology.

==============================

DEMONSTRATIONS PROGRAM:

The demonstration program will feature novel research prototypes that
demonstrate the latest advancements in multimedia computing and
communications technologies.  Demonstrations will be presented in
two different formats.  Featured Demonstrations will be
shown during conference sessions on Wednesday.  The Featured
Demonstrations and other Interactive Demonstrations
will be available during the Wednesday evening Demonstration Session.
The demonstrations will be exhibited at regular intervals by their
creators.  Time will also be provided for personal interaction with
the systems.

--------------------------------------------------------

Interactive Demonstrations:

7:00 pm -- 10:00 pm

The multimedia forum kiosk and Narli
Christopher M. Hoadley, Sherry Hsi, and Benjamin Berman,
University of California at Berkeley

Collaborative multimedia in SHASTRA
Chandrajit Bajaj and S. Cutchin, Purdue University

Automatic recognition of film genres
Wolfgang Effelsberg, Stephan Fischer, and Rainer Lienhart,
University of Mannheim

HEIDI-II: A testbed for interactive multimedia delivery and communication
Max Ott, G. Michelitsch, and J. Hearn, C&C Research Labs, NEC USA

An object-oriented model for the semantic interpretation of multimedia data
Rob Adams, James Griffioen, and Raj Yavatkar, University of Kentucky

Managing real-time services in multimedia networks using dynamic visualization 
a
nd high-level controls
G. Pacifici, M.C. Chan, and Rolf Stadler, Columbia University


===================


VIDEO PROGRAM AND CONFERENCE VIDEOTAPE 

A collection of videotapes demonstrating multimedia systems and ideas
has been selected based on technical content and relevance  to the
conference themes.  These videotapes have been assembled into the
conference videotape, which will be presented during the conference
in the demonstrations area and over the television system in the
conference hotel.  In addition, the videotape will be available for
purchase at the conference.  The conference videotape is an important
component of the conference because it allows you to see a range
multimedia systems in action. 

===================

EXHIBITS PROGRAM

ACM Multimedia'95 is vital for the entire spectrum of progressive
executives, managers, investors, researchers, designers/developers,
technical staff, software engineers, educators, and artists working in
any and all aspects of state-of-the-art multimedia research,
development, and production -- the individuals who choose the products
and technologies to be used in every major university and industrial
research setting.  More than one-half of Multimedia attendees
recommend, specify, or approve purchases of the products and services
represented.  Businesses have a unique opportunity to reach these
individuals through the Multimedia '95 exhibits program.

Cost of space for Exhibitors in Exhibit Hall is $15.00 per square
foot. Minimum space requirement is 80 square feet (8' x 10').
Exhibitors receive one complimentary full registration per company.
Cost of space for Publishers in Publishers' Row is $12.00 per square
foot. Sales of all types re restricted to Publishers' Row.
Sponsorships and advertising are available to Exhibitors only.
Exhibit Days are November 7 and 8, Tuesday and Wednesday.

For further details contact:

Don Collier 
DC Expositions, Inc.
555 Republic Drive, Suite 316, 
Plano, TX 75074
Phone: +1-214-423-4286   
Fax: +1-214-423-4323 
E-mail: dcexpo@aol.com

==================

CONFERENCE RECEPTION

The ACM Multimedia'95 Committee cordially invites you to a welcome reception on 
Tuesday, November 7th at the Center for the Arts Forum located at the Yerba 
Buena Gardens, 401 Mission Street,
6:30 PM  to 9:00 PM.  Come meet and greet your colleagues and catch up on 
the latest technology or just enjoy the beautiful Gardens that Yerba Buena 
is noted for. Refer to http://www.hia.com/hia/yerbabuena/ca-home.html
for more information on Yerba Buena Gardens. We look forward to seeing you 
there.

==================

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION


  Early registration date and cancellation date: October 8, 1995


  Conference registration:

                 EARLY    LATE
                 -----    ----
    ACM members: $385     $455
    non-members:  485      555
    students:     125      195


  Single Tutorial:

                 EARLY    LATE
                 -----    ----
    ACM members: $240     $265
    non-members:  285      310


  Multiple Tutorial:

                 EARLY    LATE
                 -----    ----
    ACM members: $185     $205
    non-members:  220      240


For registration information, contact

  ACM Multimedia'95
  Danieli & O'Keefe Associates, Inc
  490 Boston Post Road
  Sudbury, MA 01776
  Tel: +1-508-443-3330 x1230 or +1-800-524-1851 x1230
  Fax:  +1-508-443-4715

Completed registration forms must be mailed or faxed with payment in US 
dollars to:

  ACM Multimedia'95   
  Danieli & O'Keefe Associates, Inc 
  490 Boston Post Road 
  Sudbury, MA 01776 
  Fax: +1-508-443-4715 

Payment may be made by check or the following credit cards:  AMEX, MC,
Visa

==================

GENERAL INFORMATION

For an up-to-date information about the ACM Multimedia'95, refer to the World 
Wide Web page: http://acm.org/MM95/ or contact 

  Judy Osteller
  ACM 
  1515 Broadway
  New York, NY 10036
 
  Phone: +1-212-626-0605
  Fax: +1-212-302-5826
  E-mail: osteller@acm.org
   
===================

HOTEL RESERVATIONS

The host hotel for ACM Multimedia'95 is:
 The Hyatt Regency San Francisco
 5 Embarcadero Center
 San Francisco, CA 94111
 +1-415-788-1234
 +1-800-233-1234

 Room Rates:

  Single: $145.00
  Double: $167.00
  Business Plan Single: $162.00
  Business Plan Double: $182.00
  Triple Rooms: $187.00
  Quad Rooms: $207.00
 
You must mention Multimedia'95 to receive the special conference rate. It is
recommended that you make your reservations before October 8, 1995.

Guests of the Hyatt Regency San Francisco have use of the in-hotel fitness
center with aerobic equipment, as well as a waterfront path for walking and
jogging.

===========

AIRPORT TRANSPORTATION

The Hyatt Regency is about 20 minutes from the airport. Taxi service costs
approximately $30.00. SFO Airporter shuttles leave the airport every 10-20
minutes with service to the Hyatt at a cost of $8.00 one way; $14.00 round
trip.
For further information on the SFO Airporter, call +1-415-495-8404.

==================


AIR TRANSPORTATION

United Airlines serves San Francisco with both national and international
flights.  Special rates are available to conference participants flying
between November 2 and November 12, 1995.  These rates include a 5%
discount on any United, United Express or United Shuttle published fare
in the US and Canada or a l0% discount on business class or like fares.
All tickets must be purchased a minimum of 7 days in advance.

Reservations and schedule information may be obtained by calling the
United Meetings Desk at +1-800-521-4041.  Please refer to special meeting
ID Code: 589KA.  The meeting desk hours are Monday through Sunday,
7:00 A.M. to 10:00 P.M. Eastern Time.

===================

CAR RENTAL DISCOUNTS

United is also offering car rental discounts of 10% through AVIS and ALAMO.
You may make reservations by using the United Meeting Desk number at
+1-800-521-4041 and referring to Meeting ID Code: 589KA.

AVIS has a rental office located at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco,
headquarters for ACM Multimedia'95.

================ 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE

Program Chair

  Polle T. Zellweger, Xerox PARC

Associate Chairs

  David P. Anderson, Sonic Solutions, USA
  Florian Brody, Institute of Advanced Communications, Austria
                 Art Center College of Design, USA
  Dick C.A. Bulterman, CWI, Netherlands
  Edward A. Fox, Virginia Tech, USA
  Forouzan Golshani, Arizona State University, USA
  Ralf Guido Herrtwich, IBM Eurocoordination Multimedia, France
  Hiroshi Ishii, NTT Human Interface Laboratories, Japan
  Thomas D.C. Little, Boston University, USA
  Wendy Mackay, Rank Xerox Research Centre, Cambridge, UK
  Vicki de Mey, Apple Computer, USA
  A. Desai Narasimhalu, National University of Singapore
  Jonathan Rosenberg, c|net, USA
  Eve M. Schooler, California Institute of Technology, USA
  Brian Smith, Cornell University, USA
  William Tetzlaff, IBM Yorktown, USA
  Harrick Vin, University of Texas at Austin, USA
  Abel Weinrib, Intel, USA
  Nicole Yankelovich, Sun Microsystems Laboratories, USA

Members

  David Boyer, Bellcore, USA
  M. Cecelia Buchanan, Washington State University, USA
  John Buford, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, USA
  Tom Calvert, Simon Fraser University, Canada
  Shih-Fu Chang, Columbia University, USA
  Gino Cheng, USC, USA
  Tzi-cker Chiueh, SUNY Stony Brook, USA
  Jon Crowcroft, UCL, UK
  Asit Dan, IBM Yorktown, USA
  Roger Dannenberg, CMU, USA
  Glorianna Davenport, MIT Media Lab, USA
  Jim Foley, Georgia Tech, USA
  Mark E. Frisse, Washington University, USA
  J.J. Garcia-Luna, UC Santa Cruz, USA
  Franca Garzotto, Politecnico di Milano, Italy
  Arif Ghafoor, Purdue, USA
  Arding Hsu, Siemens Corporate Research, USA
  Ramesh Jain, UC San Diego, USA
  Kevin Jeffay, University of North Carolina, USA
  Randy Kaplan, Educational Testing Service, USA
  Randy Katz, UC Berkeley, USA
  Aurel A. Lazar, Columbia University, USA
  Bryan Lyles, Xerox PARC, USA
  Mark Manasse, DEC SRC, USA
  Hermann Maurer, Graz University of Technology, Austria
  Derek McAuley, Cambridge University, UK
  Bernard Merialdo, Institut EURECOM, France
  Beth Mynatt, Georgia Tech, USA
  Roy Rada, University of Liverpool, UK
  P. Venkat Rangan, UC San Diego, USA
  David Redell, DEC SRC, USA
  Norbert Streitz, GMD-IPSI, Germany
  Dan Swinehart, Xerox PARC, USA
  David Tennenhouse, MIT, USA
  Laura Teodosio, BAM! Software, Inc., USA
  Michael Zyda, Naval Postgraduate School, USA