Re: IPv6 only host NAT64 requirements?

Michael Richardson <mcr+ietf@sandelman.ca> Mon, 20 November 2017 14:04 UTC

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From: Michael Richardson <mcr+ietf@sandelman.ca>
To: 6man WG <ipv6@ietf.org>
Subject: Re: IPv6 only host NAT64 requirements?
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References: <m1eEGbJ-0000EhC@stereo.hq.phicoh.net> <D43E103C-27B8-48CF-B801-ACCF9B42533E@employees.org> <m1eEHPS-0000FyC@stereo.hq.phicoh.net> <59B0BEC0-D791-4D75-906C-84C5E423291B@employees.org> <m1eEIGX-0000FjC@stereo.hq.phicoh.net> <73231F8D-498E-4C77-8DA8-044365368FC9@isc.org> <CAKD1Yr1aFwF_qZVp5HbRbKzcOGqn==MRe_ewaA8Qc8t3+CVu_Q@mail.gmail.com> <44A862B7-7182-4B3A-B46E-73065FC4D852@isc.org> <D42D8D7A-6D19-4862-9BB3-4913058A83B6@employees.org> <CAFU7BARCLq9eznccEtkdnKPAtKNT7Mf1bW0uZByPvxtiSrv6EQ@mail.gmail.com> <787AE7BB302AE849A7480A190F8B93300A07AD68@OPEXCLILMA3.corporate.adroot.infra.ftgroup> <CAFU7BARoXgodiTJfTGc1dUfQ8-ER_r8UOE1c3h-+G0KTeCgBew@mail.gmail.com> <787AE7BB302AE849A7480A190F8B93300A07C625@OPEXCLILMA3.corporate.adroot.infra.ftgroup> <7EE41034-132E-45F0-8F76-6BA6AFE3E916@employees.org> <787AE7BB302AE849A7480A190F8B93300A07D481@OPEXCLILMA3.corporate.adroot.infra.ftgroup> <0C83562D-859B-438C-9A90-2480BB166737@employees.org>
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Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2017 09:04:42 -0500
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Ole Troan <otroan@employees.org>; wrote:
    >> NAT64 "A" ----- IPv4-only servers in a data center
    >> /
    >> IPv6-only node---<
    >> \
    >> NAT64 "B" ----- IPv4 Internet

    > Firstly this seems like it is over engineered. Has anyone actually
    > deployed NAT64 this way?

Yes, it's a really good way to deal with overlapping RFC1918 ranges (used for
managing devices) in different data centers. (The boot server is always at
192.168.1.2, the serial console is always at 192.168.1.3, etc.)

I've done this as far back as 2008 (with "NAT64" being implemented by a TCP
proxy terminating the entire IPv6/32)

I didn't have to pick the right source address, but I can see how this might
be an issue.

--
Michael Richardson <mcr+IETF@sandelman.ca>;, Sandelman Software Works
 -= IPv6 IoT consulting =-