Why one Internet?

Pars Mutaf <pars.mutaf@gmail.com> Tue, 10 April 2012 13:24 UTC

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Date: Tue, 10 Apr 2012 16:24:34 +0300
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Subject: Why one Internet?
From: Pars Mutaf <pars.mutaf@gmail.com>
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Hi,

In my opinion, we can add one more Internet when necessary, then another
one etc.

We can have as many Internets as we need, all different.

We just need a *network of Internets*.

The first (current) Internet is an IPv4 Internet.
The second Internet can be an IPv4 Internet too. In this case we would have
2 IPv4 Internets.
Obviously, in this case, we would have the same addresses used by two
different nodes in
the two Internets. I think it is possible to locate the node we need. I am
not here to discuss
these details.

The second Internet can be an IPv6 Internet.

The second Internet can be a IPv7 Internet.

The second Internet can be IPv6 but we may have a third one which is IPv7
etc.

We just need a network of Internets, all possibly different.

Pars
http://content-based-science.org/