Re: [93attendees] Pickpocket frequency was: RE: what currency is widely used in Czech?

Bob Briscoe <ietf@bobbriscoe.net> Sat, 11 July 2015 01:22 UTC

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Date: Sat, 11 Jul 2015 02:21:59 +0100
From: Bob Briscoe <ietf@bobbriscoe.net>
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Subject: Re: [93attendees] Pickpocket frequency was: RE: what currency is widely used in Czech?
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I walked across Prague earlier this year wearing a hi-viz jacket with 
Security written across the back (actually a joke we had going in a 
network security group I was in). It kept the p-ps at a distance tho.

Time before that, when I was in Prague, a prostitute accosted me in the 
street and seemed to be fumbling round my nether regions, but made off 
with a note from my wallet. The fumble wasn't worth the note, mind you.


Bob


On 10/07/15 20:43, Fernando Gont wrote:
> On 07/10/2015 02:52 PM, Pat (Patricia) Thaler wrote:
>> Well, I've spent time in 3, 5, 7, 8 and 10 on that list (Prague is 2)
>> and never had any trouble. On the other hand, my husband's pocket was
>> picked in Beijing which isn't on the top 10 list. ( He noticed it
>> immediately and nearby strangers helped chase down the thief so he
>> recovered his wallet.)
>>
>> An ordered list of cities doesn't tell you what the overall risk per
>> city is. This particular one doesn't even say what statistic it is
>> ranked on, e.g. total number, % per population; a different
>> pickpocket statistic might produce a totally different ordering. And
>> it doesn't tell you what the variation was - is it  200% or 5% more
>> likely that you run into a  picked pocket at number 2 on the list
>> than number 40?
> Even if that information was available... what would be the use of it?
>
> Don't want to be pick-pocketed? -- Usually the best way to avoid that is
> "security through obscurity" and "don't do the obvious stuff that will
> get you pick-pocketed".
>
>
> Some rules of thumb:
>
> * Don't use wallets in your trousers. If needed, use one of those
> "envelopes" that end up below your clothes.
>
> * Compartmentalize: Don't put all your valuables in the same place. Say,
> put cash in one place, and split your credit-cards in different places.
>
> * Thieves can open the zipper of your backpack but also shortcut by
> cutting it: whatever is next to a zipper, even inside the backpack is an
> easier target that something in the middle of it, surrounded by
> unrelated/random stuff.
>
> * Whenever you arrive to a city, ask a local about places where you
> shouldn't go (not in terms of pick-pocketing but in terms of, say, being
> robbed at gun point).
>
> * If you wear a backpack, either do not put any valuables inside, or if
> you do, wear the backpack on the front, rather on the back (frontpack? :-) )
>
> * Always wear the backpack on the front in very crowded places, such as
> public transport.
>
> * Avoid flashy stuff (golden rings, necklaces, etc.). Thives like them,
> and will easily make you a target.
>
> * Do not leave your belongings unattended: (unattended= you're not
> grabbing them)
>
> * If you need to operate on some valuables (e.g. pick up a phone call on
> a pricey phone), get into a nearby shop -- it's way easier for someone
> to just grab your stuff and runaway if you're in the streets.
>
> * Avoid obvious stuff that will get you robbed (e.g., if you're the only
> person walking on some random street at night, you probably shouldn't be
> there.
>
> * Always be aware of your context (if there's plenty of room and someone
> has been standing next to you, there's probably a reason for that).
>
> * If possible, when doing stuff (e.g., sightseeing), it's better if in
> groups: if you fail with anything of the above, someone else of your
> friends might notice and "save" you.
>
>
> Is the above needed for, say, Prague? -- most likely quite a bit of it
> isn't. But if you incorporate the above and are able to apply it without
> having to think about it, you'll reduce your own personal risk of being
> robbed or pick-pocketed.
>
> Thanks,
>
> -- 
> ________________________________________________________________
> Bob Briscoe                               http://bobbriscoe.net/