Re: [openpgp] SHA3 algorithm ids.

Derek Atkins <derek@ihtfp.com> Wed, 12 August 2015 14:40 UTC

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From: Derek Atkins <derek@ihtfp.com>
To: Phillip Hallam-Baker <phill@hallambaker.com>
References: <87y4hmi19i.fsf@vigenere.g10code.de> <7540C7A9-2830-4A63-8310-B684796DA279@nohats.ca> <55C681FC.9010100@iang.org> <sjma8tztbgo.fsf@securerf.ihtfp.org> <CAMm+Lwj7SxXTn+KD-eQSeZHwJB36tCgD1t0bodVsp3ovOaZ8mw@mail.gmail.com> <9A043F3CF02CD34C8E74AC1594475C73F4AD7C72@uxcn10-5.UoA.auckland.ac.nz> <CAMm+LwifPNxyj1LLA-k+8K=mmEztS42E2kcEfGFObPc0R2xvMQ@mail.gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Aug 2015 10:40:52 -0400
In-Reply-To: <CAMm+LwifPNxyj1LLA-k+8K=mmEztS42E2kcEfGFObPc0R2xvMQ@mail.gmail.com> (Phillip Hallam-Baker's message of "Tue, 11 Aug 2015 10:16:43 -0400")
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Cc: IETF OpenPGP <openpgp@ietf.org>, Derek Atkins <derek@ihtfp.com>, ianG <iang@iang.org>, Peter Gutmann <pgut001@cs.auckland.ac.nz>
Subject: Re: [openpgp] SHA3 algorithm ids.
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Phillip Hallam-Baker <phill@hallambaker.com>; writes:

> Constrained devices still exist. But the constraint on processing speed is
> easing up much more quickly than the constraint on code space and working
> memory.

You'd actually be surprised at how untrue this is.  There are tons of
devices out there still using 8- and 16-bit processors (or no processors
at all!)  What's happening is that these low-end systems are getting
installed into smaller and smaller devices.  So yes, if you look at a
particular device (e.g. cell phone) it's getting more powerful every
year.  However soon our light bulbs will be "smart".

So let's not assume that these low-end processors are going away, please?

-derek

-- 
       Derek Atkins                 617-623-3745
       derek@ihtfp.com             www.ihtfp.com
       Computer and Internet Security Consultant