Re: Why one Internet?

Pars Mutaf <pars.mutaf@gmail.com> Tue, 10 April 2012 15:46 UTC

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Date: Tue, 10 Apr 2012 18:45:51 +0300
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Subject: Re: Why one Internet?
From: Pars Mutaf <pars.mutaf@gmail.com>
To: Cameron Byrne <cb.list6@gmail.com>
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Cc: ipv6@ietf.org, Lixia Zhang <lixia@cs.ucla.edu>
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On Tue, Apr 10, 2012 at 6:25 PM, Cameron Byrne <cb.list6@gmail.com> wrote:

> On Tue, Apr 10, 2012 at 8:03 AM, Pars Mutaf <pars.mutaf@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> >
> > On Tue, Apr 10, 2012 at 5:31 PM, Brian E Carpenter
> > <brian.e.carpenter@gmail.com> wrote:
> >>
> >> Lixia,
> >>
> >> The original note says "I think it is possible to locate the node we
> >> need."
> >>
> >> So, the idea is apparently not to divide the Internet - it is simply to
> >> deal
> >> with the fact that addresses would be ambiguous. Since we have 15 years
> >> experience of the pain caused by ambiguous addresses, and a perfectly
> good
> >> 128 bit address space that avoids any need for ambiguous addresses, I
> >> don't
> >> see the point. It isn't even worth sending the code.
> >>
> >> Pars,
> >>
> >> Your original note also says "I am not here to discuss these details."
> >> Sorry,
> >> but in the IETF it's *exactly* the details that we must discuss; that's
> >> our
> >> job. We've been doing so since 1992 to my personal knowledge.
> >>
> >
> > I propose have a network of Internets:
> >
> > Internet1
> > Internet2
> > Internet3
> > ...
> > Interntet_n
> >
> > In Internet 1 and 2 we may have two nodes with the same address.
> > The goal is to route the packet to the right Internet. I don't think it
> is
> > impossible.
> >
>
> Quite possible. Most people call it CGN.  In fact, the IETF granted a
> /10 of IPv4 for this purpose.
>
>
You mean this one?
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc6264

Figure 1 looks like what I am proposing. Right?

If so, we can also have a IPv7 with is, in addition to IPv6 (or directly
IPv7). I have no idea what IPv7
would be and why it would be needed, but it looks like we should be
flexible (to me at least).

Pars

CB
>
> > Pars
> >
> >
> >
> >>
> >> Regards
> >>   Brian
> >>
> >> On 2012-04-10 15:09, Lixia Zhang wrote:
> >> > the Internet is a means to communicate.
> >> > and the market drives for most effective/efficient/economical
> >> > communication systems (there are tradeoffs between the adjectives)
> >> > wonder if you could help explain how your picture of "network of
> >> > Internets" would be more effective and economical (than what we have
> now)
> >> >
> >> > Lixia
> >> >
> >> > On Apr 10, 2012, at 6:24 AM, Pars Mutaf wrote:
> >> >
> >> >> Hi,
> >> >>
> >> >> In my opinion, we can add one more Internet when necessary, then
> >> >> another one etc.
> >> >>
> >> >> We can have as many Internets as we need, all different.
> >> >>
> >> >> We just need a *network of Internets*.
> >> >>
> >> >> The first (current) Internet is an IPv4 Internet.
> >> >> The second Internet can be an IPv4 Internet too. In this case we
> would
> >> >> have 2 IPv4 Internets.
> >> >> Obviously, in this case, we would have the same addresses used by two
> >> >> different nodes in
> >> >> the two Internets. I think it is possible to locate the node we
> need. I
> >> >> am not here to discuss
> >> >> these details.
> >> >>
> >> >> The second Internet can be an IPv6 Internet.
> >> >>
> >> >> The second Internet can be a IPv7 Internet.
> >> >>
> >> >> The second Internet can be IPv6 but we may have a third one which is
> >> >> IPv7 etc.
> >> >>
> >> >> We just need a network of Internets, all possibly different.
> >> >>
> >> >> Pars
> >> >> http://content-based-science.org/
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